News

Welcome to Leslie's Blog.
Posted 8/12/2014 6:58pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Despite the cool maritime weather we've been having lately, the blackberries are ripening, and we will have U-pick tomorrow during our weekly summer farm open house: 4:00 to 6:30 pm. Hershey, the wether, took a sniff of the freshly painted sign last week--don't know what's in that paint, or maybe he's smarter than we realized and knows it spells u-pick fruit.
Hershey sniffs upick sign

If you want to pick berries, follow the signs to the north end of our farm.  We'll have someone there to show you where to pick and to provide you with buckets and pints. Cost is $3/pint.

Inside the barn, we'll have plenty of cheese for you to try and buy: chevre, ricotta, bloomies, Moonglo and Huckleberry Blue.

Our gelato flavors this week include:

  • Chocolate
  • Vanilla
  • Mint
  • Lemon Creme
  • Hazelnut
  • Peach Sorbetto

There are several other flavors by the pint for purchase as well.

Stewart's Artisan Breads will be here with his usual delicious assortment of breads, bagels, cookies and granola.

Tomahnous Farm and Heirloominous Farm will have gorgeous summer produce including greens, okra, tomatoes, squashes and eggplant.

Laurence, the Knife Dude, will be here to sharpen your knives while you shop and visit with the goats. 

The Land Connection will be here to talk to folks about what this wonderful non-profit organization is doing to help bring more local food to our community.

Don't forget to come back to the farm on Friday, August 15th for our Third Friday Pop-Up.  From 5:30 to 7:30, you can enjoy hot, wood-fired pizzas prepared with farm fresh ingredients by NOMAD Food Co. of Chicago.  We'll have some side salads and Homer Sodas too. Want some adult beverages--you are welcome to bring your own.  Ryan Groff of Elsinore will serenade you while you dine on your delicious pizza.  


Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 8/7/2014 7:11pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

It’s about this time in summer that I can steal away a few moments to just watch my goats.  I happened to out with the goat kids one morning this week as we were sorting who’s who for tattooing. Yes, it’s all the rage even with goats, although they don’t get to choose their tattoo—no “Elaine’s my mommy” or “Nate’s my daddy;” just a herd code and birth number for them.  They manage to rub the tattoo ink all over themselves and each other after their tales or ears are done, making for a look akin to paint ball wars gone awry.  

I watched the milkers as they congregated in the dry lot after milking.  The air was a bit cool and damp, and the pasture was wet with the morning dew. They seemed to be mustering the energy to go out into the pasture, but no one would take the lead.  A few had realized that there were a few peach branches hanging over the fence next to the barn within their reach, and were standing on the gate to grab a few mouthfuls of peach leaves (good thing there’s no peaches this year).  Others were chewing their cud resting peacefully in the shade of the barn. 

One of the younger does, Edith, decided to make a break for the pasture. As she headed confidently toward the grasses, a few of the senior does started to follow her—the matriarchs like Chippy, Huckleberry and Chocolate.  Suddenly, another older doe challenged her boldness with a hind leg rearing and head butting.  She turned around and returned the head butt. Within seconds she was headed back towards the barn and the group that had begun to follow her was turning around as well.   

I tried to understand the social dynamic that had just transpired.  The goat dominance hierarchy is both rigid and fluid.  There are certain does who maintain their dominant position in the herd for years. Chippy is one such doe. Although she is old now and pretty skinny, you will often find her in the middle of a fight, trying to mediate between two younger does. For other does, there are daily challenges to their position in the herd.  Sometimes, the does who you think are at the low end of the dominance hierarchy will challenge another doe who you know to be a lot higher on the totem pole and win.  Other times, an unsuspecting little doe like Edith will take a bold move to be the lead out to pasture, only to be knocked down by someone who thinks she’s being a little too uppity for her own good.   

Celebrate National Farmers’ Market Week by Patronizing the Farmers’ Markets Farmers’ Markets have become plentiful throughout the nation, and how fitting to celebrate them for an entire week in the summer, at the height of summer produce abundance.  In honor of this occasion, we’ll be offering a “It’s a buck not a doe” $1 off coupon to the first 10 shoppers at each of the farmers’ markets we’re attending this Saturday, August 9th: Urbana’s Market at the Square and Chicago’s Green City Market (Lincoln Park). I will be travelling up to Chicago this week to see our wonderful Chicago patrons, while Wes and Lynn will be greeting our Urbana market goers. 

We have lots of beautiful and delicious cheeses for you:

  • Fresh chevre—plain, herbs de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Fresh ricotta
  • Angel Food—it’s young, so let it ripen in your frig for a week if you like it gooey
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie—great for eating this weekend
  • Black Goat—also young, but quite tasty
  • Moonglo—how about serving this melted with some sliced tomato and basil?? YUM
  • Huckleberry Blue—this batch is sweet and tangy—perfect for a tomato salad or a blue cheese burger  

The gelato is tasting mighty fine too. Flavors include (flavors with asterisk are those that will be available at both markets): We have mostly pints and a few single servings available.

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Honey Chevre*
  • Mint*
  • Stracciatella
  • Thai Basil*
  • Cucumber Lime Mint Sorbetto*
  • Nectarine Sorbetto*  

Looking for something to carry those cold and frozen treats home in? Why not purchase one of our insulated tote bags with our logo printed on the side. The testimonials are coming in on the totes: several customers have told us they left their gelato in the tote without an ice pack in their hot car for over an hour, and the gelato was still frozen solid. Now that’s good insulation! Don’t forget to check out our hip and stylish “teat” towels too.  Made from organic cotton flour sacks and adorned with various poses of “Chippy” the goat, they are both beautiful and functional.   

Other farm happenings:

Wednesday Farm Open House will probably include another blackberry u-pick opportunity (if the weather ever warms up).

Third Friday Pop-up: August 15th featuring wood fired pizzas by Chicago’s Nomad Food Co.

Fall Farm Dinner tickets go on Sale Friday, August 15th at 12 NOON.


Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 8/5/2014 1:56pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Finally, the weather and the berries are aligned, and we should have enough black berries for u-pick during our Wednesday Farm Open House (4:00 to 6:30 pm).

If you're interested in picking berries, please go to the NORTH side of our farm (the field is just north of our neighbor's brick house). You will see a silver hoop barn and a couple of horses. Someone will be there to show you where to pick and give you buckets for picking.  We will also provide pints for you to transfer your berries into once you have picked what you want. Price is $3/pint.  

We will host our usual farm open house inside the pole barn with plenty of cheese and gelato for sale.  This week's gelato flavors by the scoop include two types of Stracciatella (that's Italian for chocolate chip)--vanilla and mint.  We'll also have Nectarine Sorbetto, Krista's Honey Chevre and few other surprises.  Tomorrow is Krista's (this summer's gelato maker) last day on the farm before she heads out to go back to school in New Hampshire, so come by to say thanks and wish her well.  

Tomahnous Farm and Heirloominous Farm will be here with their mouthwatering summer veggies. Tomahnous Farm also has the most gorgeous Gladiolas too.  

Stewart's Artisan Breads will have his usual fare of rustic breads, bagels, cookies and granola. 

Laurence the Knife Dude will be here to sharpen your knives to paper cutting perfection while you shop or visit with the goats. 

Don't forget to reserve tickets for the August 10th Fork in the Road Tasting Trail.  Deadline for sign up is TOMORROW (WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6TH AT 5:00PM).  We will have to cancel the tour if we don't have enough people. We will probably be cancelling the September tour as well.  

Also, there are a few seats left for this coming Saturday's (August 9th) Farm Dinner with guest chef Jordan Coffey of American Harvest Eatery in Springfield.  Our guest farmer is Stan Schutte of Triple S Farms.  The menu is posted on our website.  

 

 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 7/31/2014 10:48pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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 “Don't it always seem to go 

That you don't know what you've got

Till it's gone 

They paved paradise  And put up a parking lot”

from Joni Mitchell’s song “Yellow Taxi”

farm paradise

I’ve been thinking a lot lately of prescient nature of Joni Mitchell’s song from my youth.  In a little less than two weeks, the excavators and the bulldozers will arrive on the hallowed farm ground in our midst to begin the extension of Olympian Drive eastward over the railroad tracks.  I confess I am sad, very sad.

Over the eleven years plus that we have lived here, I have felt the slow transformation in my bones from easterner to prairie dweller.  I have come to embrace the flatness of this place, the truly big, transparent sky, the way corn grows ten feet tall seemingly overnight, the sounds of clanking, creaking rail cars when the windy prairie air is finally still.  I have come to value the history of my surroundings; of the Native Americans who settled along the Saline Branch and who probably paddled their canoes over our fields when it rained in the spring.  I have come to respect deeply my neighbors, descendants of the German immigrant farmers who settled this land after the Civil War and drained the wet prairie, somehow knowing that its soils would yield them riches for generations to come. 

We knew our little piece of ground was special when we bought it.  We are so close to town, yet we feel as if we are in the middle of the country as we stand in our front yard.  The traits that have made our farm so wonderful are the same ones that made it vulnerable to development.  Unlike the lyrics of Joni Mitchell’s “Yellow Taxi,” we DO know what we’ve got.  We just couldn’t convince the powers that be that our paradise is really the community’s paradise. 

Turkey woes It’s hard to keep poultry alive in the country.  Our experiences with chickens, guinea hens and ducks has somewhat hardened us to the realities that everyone loves to eat poultry.  So, when we constructed the moveable pen for the turkeys, we knew of the potential dangers lurking in the shadows.  We were certain that the thick chicken wire and the barbed wood baffles on the bottom of the pen would keep most of the known predators out.  What we didn’t anticipate was that one would put his little dexterous hand inside the cage and try to pull a turkey out.  One night last week, a raccoon (who else has such dexterous hands??) stuck his (or her) hand through the chicken wire and grabbed one of our turkey’s wings, mortally wounding the poor turkey.  So, now there are eight.  They are growing beautifully. We must keep them alive.  turkeys

Farmers’ Markets, Dinner Tickets and Fork in the Road Tasting Trail

We’re attending one market this Saturday, August 2nd: Urbana’s Market at the Square.  All of our cheeses are tasting really great right now—must be all that delicious pasture the goats are eating. We’ll have:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herbs de Provence, Cracked pepper
  • Fresh, whole milk ricotta
  • An assortment of bloomy rind cheeses including Angel Food (very limited), Little Bloom on the Prairie (young, but very delicious) and Black Goat.
  • Moonglo
  • Huckleberry Blue

For gelato, we’ll have:

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Margot’s Fresh Mint
  • Espresso
  • Honey Lavender (it’s back and it’s wonderful)
  • Sweet corn (made with organic sweet corn from Severson Farm)
  • Cucumber Lime Mint Sorbetto

I’ve been plugging our upcoming dinner with guest chef Jordan Coffey of Springfield’s American Harvest Eatery because we have several seats still available for this dinner AND it's going to be GREAT. If you haven’t checked out the menu yet, please do.  He will be serving pork raised by Stan Schutte of Triple S Farms, and Stan will be our guest farmer for the meal. We hope you can join us. 

Tickets for the final five fall dinner dates will be going on sale on Friday, August 15th at 12 noon. You might want to familiarize yourself with the themes, and how to purchase tickets through our ShowClix page BEFORE they go on sale. 

IF YOU’RE LOOKING FOR A FUN WAY TO SPEND A SUNDAY AFTERNOON IN AUGUST, PLEASE CONSIDER SIGNING UP FOR OUR AUGUST 1OTH “FORK IN THE ROAD” TASTING TRAIL.  


Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 7/29/2014 8:46pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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This week's open house (Wednesday from 4:00 to 6:30 pm) has an explosion of summer gelato flavors:

gelato pans

  • Thai Basil
  • Sweet Corn
  • Vanilla pistachio brittle
  • Cucumber lime mint
  • Chocolate (how can you not have chocolate all the time!)

We'll also have the regular flavors by the pint including:

  • Chocolate
  • Vanilla
  • Honey Chevre
  • Honey Lavender
  • Espresso
  • Peach sorbetto

We have plenty of cheese for you as well:

  • Fresh chevre
  • Fresh ricotta
  • Angel Food
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie
  • Black Goat
  • Moonglo
  • Huckleberry Blue

Our farmer friends will be here with gorgeous summer produce: Tomahnous Farm and Heirloominous Farm both.

Stewart's Artisan Breads will be here with his rustic breads, bagels, cookies and granola.

Last, but certainly not least, Laurence, the Knife Dude, will be here after a long hiatus, to sharpen your knives while you visit the farm and eat giant bowls of gelato.  

 


 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 7/24/2014 10:02pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farmers’ Markets, Farm Happenings

We’re attending two markets this Saturday, July 26th: Urbana’s Market at the Square and Chicago’s Green City Market.  With the onset of fresh field tomatoes (read all about my first tomato bliss in the blog post below), the bloomy rind cheeses are a must buy. However, I have recommendations for using ALL of our cheeses with tomatoes this week! We’ll have:

  • Angel Food Brie—these are ripe and ready to eat this weekend!
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie—this batch of camembert style goat cheese is a bit young, but can either enjoy it now, or ripen it in your frig for a few days
  • Black goat—the delicate ash-ripened round; also on the young side, but perfectly delicious now or later
  • Fresh chevre: plain, herbs de Provence or cracked pepper—you can dot your tomato salad with some of this creamy deliciousness, then slice some fresh basil over all of it.
  • Fresh goat milk ricotta—how about stuffing a tomato with some ricotta, a few shallots and fresh herbs and dusting it with some panko bread crumbs before placing it in a hot oven to bake for a 20 minutes?
  • Moonglo—our raw milk tomme. Looking for a way to make fancy grilled cheese and tomato sandwiches? This cheese is the ticket
  • Huckleberry Blue:  toss some tomato wedges in a light vinaigrette; crumble some our blue cheese over the top along with toasted pecans. 

We’ve got some great gelato and sorbetto flavors for you to try this week (* indicates available at both markets this weekend):

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Fresh Mint*
  • Pistachio (very limited quantities)
  • Honey Chevre*
  • Espresso
  • Red Currant-Apple Mint Sorbetto*
  • Peach Sorbetto*  

In addition to our delicious edible products, we’ll be bringing some of non-edible products as well, including our insulated tote bags, some of our goat tee-shirts and our NEW “teat” towels (organic flour sack cloths with a few whimsical versions of Chippy the Goat-play on the tea towel). Check out the “merch” at our stand at the Urbana Farmers’ Market. 

Don’t forget to take a look at the upcoming farmdinners on our website. Several still have seats available.  We will be releasing the tickets for the final five fall dates on Friday, August 15th.  Details to follow.  Also, if you’ve been looking for something unusual to do with out of town guests, check out our August 10th “Fork in the Road” tasting trail tour.  Rumor has it that KD Ranch will have a new baby zebra to show off. 

Farm News:Tomatoes, Flat Tires and False Doldrums

Tomato season has come in with a whimper this year. With the roller coaster rides of rains and air temperatures, my vigilance for ripe tomatoes slackened.  I got tired of watching the green tomatoes hanging from the vines.  With a good several days of drying weather, I regained some hope, only to watch blight set into the vines of several of our heirloom varieties.  Beneath the shriveled brown leaves and black spotted fruit, I spied a few red, black (more like deep purple red) orange and green (yes, yellow-green for the Cherokee Green tomatoes) tomatoes clinging to their vines. 

I collected them with care, brought them into the house, cut out the rotted parts, sliced them, sprinkled some coarse salt and drizzled them with a little olive oil.  The field-warm tomato at peak ripeness—juicy, sweet, tart-a lycopene explosion in my mouth; if Keats didn’t write a sonnet about tomatoes, he should have. 

Unlike last summer’s drought, this summer’s prolific rains have left the farm tall with vegetation, both good and bad.  The orchard grasses have grown too tall between the trees, the weeds are in a race to set seeds, and our lawn looks as lush as springtime.  The vegetation seems to have conspired against us and has consorted with our tractors and lawn mowers to keep their stature intact.  Every time we attempted to mow this past week, we were foiled with either a flat tire or a broken mower blade.  We finally brought in the big guns (aka, our neighbor who has a landscaping business and a fancy whirling riding mower) and won the battle over the lawn.  The orchard grasses will live to fight another day. 

The Doldrums—connotes a time of laziness, of summer heat stultifying humans into a stupor of inactivity.  Farm life in the summer is the antithesis of laziness—milk the goats, make the cheese, feed the kids, weed the garden, harvest the garden, fight the pests, sell the farm products—really there aren’t enough hours in the day to do it all the way you’d like the chores to be done.  Yet, the stillness of the air beckons you to slow down, to stop in your tracks, to sit on your porch and eat corn on the cob and chin-dripping peaches.  I do sometimes pine for that dead calm air to push me down, to force me to relax, even just a little.   

 



Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 7/22/2014 9:35pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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The kitchen at Prairie Fruits Farm has been busy preparing some great foods for you to take home tomorrow during our farm open house, Wednesday, July 23rd from 4:00 to 6:30 pm.  


We'll have mixed berry cobbler, several jams, and peach, corn & tomato salsa (this is a fresh salsa). Of course, there will be plenty of cheese to accompany those jams including fresh chevre, fresh ricotta, bloomy rind cheeses, Moonglo and Huckleberry Blue.  

Gelato flavors include:

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Mint
  • Chocolate Mint
  • Peach Sorbetto
  • Hazelnut

As well as a few other flavors in pints only.  Consider purchasing one of our new insulated tote bags to put those pints into-you won't even need an ice pack. 

Stewart's Artisan Breads returns with an assortment of hearty breads, bagels, cookies and granola.

Tomahnous Farm will be here with some berries, and lots of great summer veggies.

Heirloominous Farm will have fresh summer veggies as well. 


 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 7/17/2014 10:14pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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I am trying a new format to our newsletter--farm happenings and farmers' market news first, blog second. Please let me know what you think of this change.

Farm Happenings and Farmers’ Markets

Friday, July 18th (that’s either today or tomorrow, depending on when you’re reading this email), we’re hosting another “Third Friday Pop-Up,” from 5:30-7:30 pm.  We have live music from “Los Guapos” and a southern food-inspired menu.  Check out all the details on our website. NO RESERVATIONS REQUIRED.

Saturday, July 19th, we’re attending Urbana’s Market at the Square. Unlike last Saturday (deluge anyone), the weather forecast is calling for sunny skies and perfect market going temperatures.  We’ve got some beautiful summer cheeses for you:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herbs de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Fresh goat milk ricotta
  • Bloomies: Angel Food, Little Bloom on the Prairie and Black Goat
  • Moonglo
  • Huckleberry Blue

Need some gelato? We’ll have pints and assorted single servings of:

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Lemon Balm
  • Tart Cherry Stracciatella
  • Thai Basil
  • Red Currant-Apple Mint Sorbetto
  • Nectarine Sorbetto

Worried that your gelato will melt if you buy it at the market? Worry no more! You can purchase one of our re-usable insulated tote bags with the Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery Logo.

Other happenings: Don’t forget to check out the menus for our upcoming farm dinners on July 26th and August 9th-we still have seats available for both of these dinners. The menus look amazing! Also, check out our next Fork in the Road Tasting Trail—August 10th.  We have plenty of spots open for the tour. Come join us.

Winning udders and junior Nigerian Dwarfs

This past Tuesday, we piled into a rented mini-van, NYC teenage girls in tow, and drove to Louisville, KY to attend the American Dairy Goat Association’s (ADGA) Annual Goat Show.  While we’ve never shown our own goats, I am intrigued by the show goat world.  Does the adage, “beauty is only skin deep,” apply to livestock?  Do those large udders hold up to commercial dairy rigors? I have been to a few goat shows at county and state fairs, but I’ve never been to the “Miss America” of the goat show world: The ADGA National Show.  Dairy goat breeders from all over the country convene for one week with the hopes of taking home a blue ribbon or the coveted “Grand Champion” title. 

One of our part-time milkers, Carolyn, is a judge for ADGA, and she has taught me a lot about conformation—how a dairy goat is put together, and how the body structure can translate to a long-lived, healthy, productive dairy doe.  I admit it took me a few years before I really understood the “dairy wedge,” (narrow in the front, wide in the back—to hold that great big udder), but now I can look at my little doelings within a few days after they are born and predict the ones that have the right stuff to become a member of our milking herd.   

When we arrived at the Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville and entered the great hall, our eyes were met with a sea of dairy goats of all breeds—Nubians, La Manchas, Saanens, French Alpines, Oberhasli, Toggenbergs and Nigerian Dwarf.  Most breeders set up sleeping quarters with their animals, so amidst the stalls with goats, there were sleeping bags and inflatable mattresses.  Some of the goats were just lounging, either waiting for their turn in the show ring or resting after the stress of prior judging.  Several were on the grooming stand, being clipped and primped in anticipation of their showing.   

NYC girls at the goat show

As we approached the show ring, the Senior Nubians were in the final throws of judging.  As the judges commanded each owner to walk their doe in the prescribed pattern, the audience whispered quietly little tidbits about the herds, the owners and the usual show goat gossip.  When the Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion were finally chosen, the smart phones came out, pictures were taken and the texting frenzy of winners ensued. 

nubian winners

The highlight of the day for me was the Junior Nigerian Dwarf show. These are the tiny Nigerian doelings born this year.  As one of our NYC teenagers astutely observed, this show was akin to a caprine version of “Toddlers and Tiaras.”  While a number of them were well behaved and moved to the winners circle fairly quickly, the majority of these baby beauties squirmed and screamed, refusing to make the proper show stance.   

junior nigerians


Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 7/16/2014 7:17am by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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We'll be open from 4:00 to 6:30 PM this afternoon. The weather is VERY un-summer like, but it is a gorgeous day for an outing to the farm. Of course, you can see the goats and the growing turkeys (they are now outside in a movable pen).  

We'll have plenty of cheese for you to taste and take home:

Chevre, bloomy rinds, fresh ricotta, Moonglo and Huckleberry Blue

Gelato flavors by the scoop include :

  • Lemon Balm
  • Red Currant-Apple Mint Sorbetto
  • Rasberry Swirl
  • Hazelnut
  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate

There are many other flavors by the pint as well.

1ST EVER: NEW YORK STYLE EGG CREAMS: THIS IS A DELICIOUS OLD-FASHIONED SODA FOUNTAIN DRINK MADE WITH CARBONATED WATER, MILK AND CHOCOLATE SYRUP. We'll be making a Prairie Fruits Farm version of this using our chocolate and vanilla gelatos and carbonated water.  We've got two NYC girls in our midst to help serve you, so come out to meet our guests and try an egg cream.  They are DELICIOUS!

Tomahnous Farm will be here with veggies and berries and maybe some beautiful flowers.

Heirloominous Farm will be here with gorgeous vegetables as well.

Both Stewart's Artisan Breads and Laurence the Knife Dude are on vacation this week, but Stewart's Breads will be back next week.


 

 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 7/11/2014 8:43am by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

The turkey poults have grown.  Their adult plumage is mostly in place, the classic fan tails are beginning to appear and the toms are now easily distinguishable from the hens—mostly by size. A couple of the toms have even puffed out their chests in classic male show-off fashion.   Their graduation from chick-hood to turkey teenage-hood was obvious. So, it was time to move them into their moveable pastured pen.  The pen is a veritable poultry “Fort Knox,” built to accommodate the large size of the turkeys as they grow and to keep the most persistent coyote out.  Unlike the other birds we have moved in the past (chickens, ducks, guinea hens), these turkeys were mellow.  They didn’t mind being picked up, they didn’t scamper in terror as people entered their pen or worked to finish the predator deterrents.  No, they went right to work, eating insects and pecking at bits of greenery below them. 

turkeys in pasture

The neighbor’s field to the south that was planted in wheat last fall was finally ready for harvest this week. You could catch the smell of drying grains from the road, driving by the field with the car windows down.   The red combine rolled out on to the field yesterday, and we watched the grain flying into the hopper.  Soon, they’ll cut the wheat straw and we’ll stack the bales in our barn for bedding this fall and winter.  They’ll probably plant a short season variety of soybeans in that field next week—so goes the old fashioned grain crop rotation in these parts.

Farmers’ Markets

We’re attending two markets this Saturday, July 12th: Urbana’s Market at the Square and Chicago’s Green City Market. Here’s the lineup for cheese:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herbs de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Fresh goat milk ricotta
  • Angel Food brie
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie (camembert)
  • Lena –ash ripened, mushroomy rind—a one-off for Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery. These dappled-grey beauties are ripe and ready to eat this weekend, so we’re running a special: 50% off each round. My recommendation for enjoying this cheese: slice up some nice crusty bread, spread cheese on bread, place slice of fresh tomato (they are making their appearances at farmers’ markets all over now) and a fresh basil leaf on top, drizzle with a little olive oil and ENJOY!
  • Moonglo
  • Huckleberry Blue

Gelato flavors include (* for Green City Market):

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Stracciatella
  • Tart Cherry Stracciatella
  • Espresso
  • Thai Basil*
  • Nectarine sorbetto*
  • Peach sorbetto*
  • Red currant-apple mint sorbetto*


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