News

Welcome to Leslie's Blog.
Posted 6/9/2014 3:54pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Hello CSA members:
It's time again for CSA pickup  We have pick ups tomorrow, Tuesday, June 10th for both Bloomington locations:
4:30 to 5:30 pm at the St. Luke Union Church  2101 E Washington St, Bloomington, IL 61701 (with PrairieErth Farm CSA)
6:00 to 7:00 pm at the Unitarian Church on Emerson St. Bloomington (with Henry Brockman's CSA).

Our farm CSA pickup this week will be held on Wednesday, June 11th from 4:00 to 6:30 pm during our Farm Open House time.  

As I mentioned last week, if you are unable to come in person to pick up your shares, please have someone else pick up for you. Please email me to let me know who your substitute is and provide me with their phone number so I can reach them if they forget to pick up.  If no one comes by to pick by the end of the allotted time, I will attempt to call you or your friend and stay if you are on your way to the pick up location.


Our policy for no-shows that haven't given me advance notice is that you forfeit that week's shares.

Also, I will always bring extras of cheese, bread and gelato if you would like to get products in addition to your bi-weekly shares. 

Please let me know if you have any questions. I look forward to seeing you all this week.

 


 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 6/6/2014 7:54am by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

Tales from the barn: Early Tuesday morning, Ben arrived to start his usual morning routine of coaxing the does out of the barn for milking.  When he opened the door to the barn, he discovered a little doeling wandering around in search of someone willing to let her nurse.  She was tall, completely dry and sure footed. He looked around for an obvious mother, but couldn’t find one. Convinced that she was an escapee from the kid barn, he put her in a newborn box and got milking underway. 

When I came out to feed the kids, he told me about the little “runaway.”  I took one look at her, didn’t see a familiar face and started the search for the suspected mother.  It had to be one of the does who we thought wasn’t pregnant. The kid had hybrid ears so it had to be a La Mancha mother and Nubian father (we had only left Nate and Eddie in the doe barn past December). I went straight to Wolfie and Squirrel.  Wolfie’s udder was still deflated and she was completely dry on her back side. Squirrel was standing off in a corner, agitated—first good sign. I turned her around. She had dried birth fluid on her udder and it was swollen. Bingo! She must have kidded very late in the evening (after Wes’ usual evening rounds) or very early in the morning.  Ben milked her out, I gave the little doeling her first bottle, and she downed a full bottle in less than five minutes!  Squirrel, true to her name; a stealth pregnancy and a stealthy mother again.

Fruit Crop Update:  I finally had a chance to walk the orchard this week to see what kind of fruit crop we’ll have this year. Wes had taken stock of the blackberry canes earlier, with the sad news that all the flowering canes had not survived the harsh winter, and only vegetative canes were alive.  I searched peach limbs for any sign of a peach to no avail. Pears came up blank as well. I thought I had spotted a few cherries on our fully leaved cherry trees, but on closer inspection, there aren’t that many there—barely enough for a pie.  When I got the apple rows, I was overjoyed to find most of the varieties with a respectable crop on their branches.   We will have apples; we might have cider. 

Dreaming of bloomy rinds:  We’re in the thick of early summer milk now, and this means making lots and lots of bloomy rind cheeses:  little bloom on the prairie on Mondays, black goat on Wednesdays, Angel Food on Thursdays.  Lots of little cheeses translate to lots of flipping, salting, more flipping, wrapping and labeling. It’s hard not to feel like Lucy Arnez in the chocolate factory; ladle, flip, salt, flip, ladle, flip, salt, flip.  When I go to sleep at night, I don’t count sheep; I count Angel Foods dropping out of their block molds when I pound them on the drain table.

Farmers’ Markets and Other Farm Happenings

We’re attending one market this Saturday: Urbana’s Market at the Square. We’ll have a full house of those little bloomy rind cheeses including:

  • Little Bloom on the Prairie—our goat milk camembert-it’s perfectly ripe this week—excellent for serving alongside your grill fare
  • Angel Food—our little “baby” brie cheeses—this is our new size.  You can almost eat one whole in one sitting
  • Black Goat—these ash-coated rounds have a crinkly “geotrichum” rind—slightly yeasty. The paste is a bit more firm than in little bloom—very delicious
  • We also have plenty of fresh chevre:  plain, herbs de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Fresh whole milk ricotta—perfect for a simple pasta with fresh shell peas and spring onions
  • Moonglo—last of the fall milk batch; sharp, complex and delicious
  • Huckleberry Blue and Eldon: goat and sheep milk blue cheeses, respectively-try a piece of each for comparison.

Wes and Krista have been very busy spinning gelato this week-gearing up for warmer weather (it’s certainly plenty warm in the kitchen where they’re spinning gelato):

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Espresso
  • Strawberry
  • Honey Chevre
  • Rhubarb Sorbetto (limited supply)

Upcoming Farm events

Don’t forget to sign up for our “Fork in the Road”  Tasting Tour on June 15th—this three-legged tour takes you to our farm, KD Bison ranch and Sleepy Creek Vineyard.  You’ll be amazed at the beauty and diversity of agriculture right here in east-central Illinois.  Visit our website for details and signup.

Calling all farmers! We’re hosting an Agritourism Intensive workshop here on the farm—June 23-25th.  If you have people calling you wanting to visit your farm or if you’ve thought about bringing folks to your farm to diversify your income stream, this workshop is for you! For all the details and to register, visit the Land Connection’s website.  The deadline for sign up is approaching fast, so don’t delay.  I know this is farmers’ busy season, but I promise you will find this workshop time well spent!

Next Third Friday Pop-Up at Prairie Fruits Farm is Friday June 20th.  The theme is artisan sausages and beer.  We’ll be featuring hand-made sausages from Piedmontese Sausage—a new local charcuterie maker here in Champaign.  This “ain’t” your usual brats and beer fare. Stay tuned for more details.  


Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 6/2/2014 5:02pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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We're back to our regularly scheduled Wednesday Farm Open House this week--June 4th from 4:00 to 6:30pm.  We have lots of great cheese for you to sample and buy (chevre, bloomy rind cheeses, blue cheese). We'll have gelato by the scoop and pint--strawberry and rhubarb will be our local flavors this week.  We'll also be doing a special gelato sundae (it's a surprise). We have Homer Sodas to cool you down too.

Stewart's Artisan Breads will be here with an assortment of bagels, breads, cookies and granola bars.

Tomahnous Farm will be here with salad mix, spring greens, herbs, gorgeous flowers, bedding plants and MORE!

INTRODUCING: Heirloominous Farm--our incubator farmer, Shea Belahi, will be selling some of her early season produce--radishes, greens, bedding plants, etc. 

Come out to stroll the farm and see the animals. The turkey poults (that's the correct terminology for turkey chicks) are growing by leaps and bounds. We might even have our first Nigerian Dwarf babies on the ground (Cinder is looking VERY pregnant and uncomfortable right now.)

"FORK IN THE ROAD" TASTING TRAIL TICKETS NOW ON SALE

Our tasting trail was so popular last year, that we've decided to bring it back once per month June through September.  The trail starts at Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, continues east to K&D Ranch and ends at Sleepy Creek Vineyard.  For more details and for links to ShowClix to purchase tickets, please go to our website.

 


 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/30/2014 7:10am by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News 

This week we walked the line between simulating reality and the art of story-telling. We hosted a film crew for a couple of days who are making a feature movie called “Food.” The story revolves around an urban mother’s quest to understand where her food comes from and the tradeoffs of how it’s grown when her son develops a food-related illness. The director and the lead actress, who co-wrote the script, did their homework.  First off, they ventured to “big ag’s” belly of the beast to get a feel for the land of cash grain agriculture.  They talked with lots of farmers and even got a large-scale grain farmer to proof-read their script.  They shopped the farmers’ market, they insisted that the food the crew would eat would be locally sourced and raised organically.

After all their prep-work, they descended on our farm on Tuesday; within an hour our farm and home were transformed into a movie set.  The magnitude of equipment, people, props for making a movie were staggering, even one considered “low budget” such as this film.  I had left that afternoon to deliver our first CSA shares of cheese, bread and gelato to our members in Bloomington and when I returned that evening, the sign at the entrance to our farm had been removed and in its place read “Prairie Organic Farms.” I have to admit their sign looked a lot more professional than ours. 

Danny Glover became the “farmer” at Prairie Organic Farms.  We taught him how to feed hay and grain to our goat kids and how to hang a milk bucket feeder on the fence line and hold it in place while all the kids mobbed a single bucket—six nipples for 20 plus kids makes for a milk mob nightmare.  I should mention that this scene was shot at about 9:30PM!  The kids had already bedded down, and initially, were thrilled with the idea of evening milk, until they realized it was only one bucket feeder and they could only drink for a minute. 

The next day’s shoot involved weeding a field.  Wes was cast as an extra and had to give the hired actors who were cast as field hands a lesson in identifying the plants you want to kill and the ones you want to keep.  He also had to show them how to hold a hoe.  When they started shooting the scene, several people remarked that one of the guys hoeing weeds really looked authentic. That was Wes. 

As someone living the realities of trying to farm sustainably in a world of agriculture fraught with compromises and hidden costs, I appreciate the film folks’ attempts to shed light on how America grows its food and how deep the chasm has grown between farmers and consumers.  I appreciate the difficulties in telling a story, trying to stay true to the core values, but needing to fictionalize parts to make the story more compelling.  It’s just hard to bite my tongue when I want the reality of what we do to be the main attraction. 

Farmers’ Markets

We’re attending two farmers’ markets this weekend: Urbana’s Market at the Square and Chicago’s Green City Market.  The weather should be gorgeous, so come out to shop and get some great spring produce. Our cheese repertoire is growing and we’re bidding farewell to the last of our aged sheep milk cheeses and fall milk raw milk cheeses:

  • Fresh Chevre: plain, herbs de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Fresh goat milk ricotta
  • Last of the brine-aged sheep milk feta—REALLY!
  • A full house of bloomy rind cheeses: Baby angel food, little bloom on the prairie, black goat
  • Moonglo—last of the fall milk batches, dry texture but complex flavor—perfect for shaving on roasted asparagus.
  • Eldon: the last wheels of our sheep milk blue-I tasted some yesterday and it seems to be getting better with age—come try it at the market.

Our gelato flavors reflect the classics and the spring (* indicates the local flavors we’re bringing to Green City Market):

  • Chocolate
  • Vanilla
  • Hazelnut
  • Fresh Mint*
  • Local Strawberry*

As June looms on the horizon, we’ll be putting our attention on summer open houses and our “Fork in the Road” tasting trail series. Stay tuned for more details about these events next week.  Happy local food eating.


 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/29/2014 1:13pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Just want to remind folks that our open house will be held this afternoon from 4:00 to 6:30pm.

We have cheese for you to sample and buy. We've got gelato by the scoop and pints to take home. We're also doing something special today with gelato--make your own sundaes!!  

Tomahnous Farm will be here with spring produce, plants and flowers.

Stewart's Artisan Breads will be here with his usual assortment of bagels, breads, cookies, pastries and granola.  

Come on out and see the goats, sit in the shade, enjoy a sultry early summer afternoon on the farm. We hope to see you here!

 


 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/26/2014 11:40am by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Hello CSA members:
This is your email reminder that our CSA begins this week.  We have pick ups tomorrow, Tuesday, May 27th for both Bloomington locations:
4:30 to 5:30 pm at the St. Luke Union Church  2101 E Washington St, Bloomington, IL 61701 (with PrairieErth Farm CSA)
6:00 to 7:00 pm at the Unitarian Church on Emerson St. Bloomington (with Henry Brockman's CSA).

Our farm CSA pickup this week only will be held on Thursday May 29th from 4:00 to 6:30 pm during our Farm Open House time.  You all should have received my email last week explaining why we had to move the day from its usual Wednesday afternoon to Thursday afternoon. All subsequent farm pickups will be held on alternate Wednesdays.

As I mentioned last week, if you are unable to come in person to pick up your shares, please have someone else pick up for you. Please email me to let me know who your substitute is and provide me with their phone number so I can reach them if they forget to pick up.  If no one comes by to pick by the end of the allotted time, I will attempt to call you or your friend and stay if you are on your way to the pick up location.


Our policy for no-shows that haven't given me advance notice is that you forfeit that week's shares.

Also, I will always bring extras of cheese and gelato if you would like to get products in addition to your bi-weekly shares. 

Please let me know if you have any questions. I look forward to seeing you all this week.

 

 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/22/2014 11:21pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

This year, we decided to try our hand at raising turkeys for our 100 Yard Dinner. I’ve always been intrigued by turkeys, especially the striking heritage breeds such as Narragansett and Bourbon Reds.  I’ve admired them from a distance on other farms; their grandeur, their poise.  So, when we decided to raise turkeys, I was both fearful and curious.  They are poultry, but they are different from chickens.  Meat chickens, unlike laying hens, are not bred for longevity.  They eat, they grow, they get eaten; all within a span of no longer than two to three months.  Although we have raised a breed of chicken called the “Freedom Ranger,” a bird designed for foraging and thriving on pasture, they still live a brief (albeit pastoral and happy—or so I’d like to believe) life.

Turkeys, in contrast, live longer and seem to have a slightly greater awareness of the humans who care for them.  I admit that this impression is borne solely from observing other farmers’ turkeys, the beautiful ones who roam freely and greet visitors who arrive at the farm.  I haven’t really known any industrial turkeys—the large white ones with large breasts whose reputation for intelligence does not put them at the top of their class. After researching our options for breeds (white ones were ruled out immediately), we decided on the Bronze.

We consulted with several of our farmer friends who have raised several breeds of turkey, and all agreed that heritage breeds can be challenging and high maintenance, especially for the uninitiated.  The Bronze is a hybrid turkey. It retains some of the genetics of the heritage breeds, but it is more domesticated, is less subject to flight and has stronger instinct for self-preservation.  They also tend to grow a little faster (not quite as fast as the white ones) than the heritage breeds. 

Our day-old turkey chicks arrived yesterday in the mail—all 15 of them. I love getting the early morning phone call from the guy on the night shift at the post office letting you know you have a box of peeping chicks that need to be picked up. Sometimes you can hear the chirping chicks in the background of the phone call.  Wes picked them up, brought them back to the farm and we put them under heat lamps in our “kid newborn pen.”  Wes dipped each one’s beak in water so they would know how to drink.  Once they realized their newfound freedom, they began to explore their environment. Unlike chicken chicks, they exude an air of confidence. They don’t seem to be afraid to venture away from each other to explore.  Within minutes of being released from their box, one of the chicks found an ant, and proceeded to eat it!!  Only two days old, and already foraging for bugs—that’s my kind of poultry.  I’ve been smitten.  Move over Freedom Rangers.

turkey chicks

Farmers’ Markets

This Saturday, May 24th, we’ll be attending the Urbana Farmers’ Market only. We’ll be there from 7AM to 12 noon. Come see us. The weather should be FINE!! We’ve got some GREAT cheese for you to try and take home:

  • Fresh Chevre 
  • Fresh Goat Milk Ricotta—this delicate fresh cheese is begging to paired with some fresh peas, mint and olive oil
  • An assortment of Bloomy Rind cheeses including Little Bloom on the Prairie AND Black Goat (it’s back in all its tangy-yeasty glory)
  • Sheep Milk Feta—very little left, still tasting amazing
  • Moonglo-raw goat milk tomme that is perfect shaved over some roasted asparagus
  • Huckleberry Blue—our sweet and savory goat milk blue is ideal for crumbling on a salad or a spring pizza

If you haven’t tried our goat milk gelato this season, the weather is finally heating up for pints of:

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Honey Chevre
  • Rhubarb Crème
  • Pistachio (very limited quantities)

Other Farm News & Events

Our mid-week Summer Open House season started this past Wednesday (yesterday), but the thunderstorms kept many folks away. Next week, we will host our Open House on Thursday, May 29th from 4:00-6:30pm. We are hosting a movie crew out here on Wednesday, so the farm won’t be open to the public.  We’ll be doing a very special gelato tasting on Thursday, so stay tuned for the details. 

There are still dinner tickets available for sale through our ShowClix page.  You can read the descriptions on our website or just go directly to the ShowClix page. We will posting sales for our first “Fork in the Road” Tasting Trail with K&D Ranch and Sleepy Creek Vineyards soon. The first tasting trail tour will be held in June. I’ll be sending out an announcement in the next week with details about how to sign up. 



Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/19/2014 9:59pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 21ST, FROM 4:00 TO 6:30 PM, we will open our doors to the public for the start of our summer farm open house season.  Each Wednesday, from now until the first week of September, you can come out to the farm, visit with the goats, stroll the grounds, eat some gelato and buy some great local foods.  There's no admission charge, and no reservations are required.  Just come and enjoy the rural beauty that surrounds us.

This Wednesday, we're featuring our cheeses:

  • Fresh chevre
  • Fresh ricotta
  • Sheep milk feta
  • An assortment of bloomy rind cheeses
  • Moonglo and Huckleberry Blue

Gelato Featured Flavors include (both scoops and pints):

  • Chocolate
  • Vanilla
  • Honey Chevre
  • Rhubarb Creme

Tomahnous Farm will be here with salad mix, spinach, asparagus, herb plants, pansies, and more.  

Laurence Mate, aka the "Knife Dude" will be here to sharpen your knives while you shop and visit with the goats. 

We look forward to seeing you here.

 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/16/2014 7:39am by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

As our kidding season appears to have come to an end (it seems that four does that should have been bred are not pregnant), I reflect on the birthing episodes that will likely stick in my mind for some time to come. On a Sunday morning nearly three weeks ago, I was not around. Wes was doing his usual Sunday morning milking and found one of our yearling first fresheners, Magda, in labor with a kid stuck in the birth canal.  One leg was out and no head was visible. I am usually the one to extract these difficult kids, but Wes was on his own this time. He managed to get the other leg out, but not the head. After struggling to insert his large hands in the birth canal to adjust the neck and head, he worried that too much time had elapsed and that the kid might be dead. In the interest of saving the mother, he pulled. The kid emerged, limp and seemingly lifeless; barely four pounds in weight.  He put the tiny doeling aside to deliver the healthy, normal-presentation buckling waiting in the wings.  While checking in the brother, he noticed that the doeling was breathing.  He and the kidding volunteer (Magdalena) got a warm bottle of colostrum into her mouth, and although she couldn’t lift her head, she clutched onto the nipple and drank.  This was the first sign of her tenacious personality. 

After the first 24 hours, it was obvious that she couldn’t stand because her shoulder was dislocated.  We brought her to the vet and they wrapped her little leg in a bandage to immobilize the shoulder. Not having walked yet, attempting to stand with only three legs proved impossible. Back to the vet for a cast so she could put weight on her injured leg.  She struggled to right her little body in this cast and could not lift herself up for a few days. This didn’t stop her from eating and screaming for attention. Within days, she was downing a full bottle of milk.  We worked her body and legs to build strength, and after nearly one week in the cast, she could stand by herself.

The cast came off and while wobbly, she was able to stand on her own and walk. She would fall down often, but pick herself up and try to follow us around the barn.  As the week progressed, her legs and confidence grew stronger, and she started to run and prance around the barn.  During feeding times, she’d scream for attention, down her full bottle of milk and gallop around the barn as we fed the other kids, cleaned water buckets and went about our normal kid feeding chores.  When the week post-cast was up, I put her back in the pen with her mates.  She fell in with the group immediately and rushed to the bucket feeder with the rest of them, all four feet planted firmly on the ground.  Magda 123, almost left for dead, joined the ranks of our boisterous kids-our miracle baby. 

Farmers’ Markets

This Saturday, May 17th, we’ll be attending two farmers’ markets: Urbana’s Market at the Square and Chicago’s Green City Market.  We’ve got some beautiful spring cheeses for you to enjoy:

  • Fresh chevre—bright, lemony, fluffy—what more can I say? The chevre screams SPRING!!: pain, herbs de Provence and cracked peppercorn
  • Experimental Angel Food: Our small, delicate bloomy rounds are fully of ooey gooey flavor
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie: camembert in style, this bloomy rind disc has a firm paste in the center slight gooey-ness around the edges
  • Sheep milk feta: this is the last batch of feta, so get it while it lasts
  • Moonglo: raw milk cheese made last fall—sharp, full of flavor
  • Huckleberry Blue: raw goat milk blue, perfect for a spring salad of beets

Wes was busy spinning gelato this week. We’ve got some new flavors as well as the regulars (* indicates flavors that will be at Green City Market as well as Urbana):

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Margot’s Fresh Mint *
  • Honey Chevre *
  • Rhubarb Crème *
  • Ginger

Come out to the market to try these and take home a pint. 

Food on the Farm Just a quick reminder that dinner tickets go on sale today at 12 noon and our first Pop-Up event is this evening from 5:30-7:30.  Details for both can be found on our website under “Food on the Farm.” 



Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/13/2014 10:28pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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As farm "reminder in chief," I'd like to bring back to your attention a few upcoming events and deadlines:

First, our "New Orleans" themed pop-up event is scheduled for this coming Friday, May 16th from 5:30 to 7:30pm. NO RESERVATIONS required.  We'll be serving local chicken and sausage gumbo, muffaletta sandwiches, andouille po boys, savory corn beignets for the vegetarians, bread pudding for dessert and sweet tea and Homer sodas.  New Orleans Jazz Band will be here to serenade you. BYOB.

Second, sales for our mid-summer, early fall farm dinners go on sale Friday May 16th at 12 noon.  To review the dates and the themes, please visit our website "2014 Dinner Season." To access the dates and the reservations,(July 26th-September 20th), please visit our Showclix Page.  

Third, our first summer farm open house will be Wednesday, May 21st from 4:00-6:30 pm.  Stay tuned for details about this event and the summer open houses in general.

 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.