News

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Posted 5/30/2014 7:10am by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News 

This week we walked the line between simulating reality and the art of story-telling. We hosted a film crew for a couple of days who are making a feature movie called “Food.” The story revolves around an urban mother’s quest to understand where her food comes from and the tradeoffs of how it’s grown when her son develops a food-related illness. The director and the lead actress, who co-wrote the script, did their homework.  First off, they ventured to “big ag’s” belly of the beast to get a feel for the land of cash grain agriculture.  They talked with lots of farmers and even got a large-scale grain farmer to proof-read their script.  They shopped the farmers’ market, they insisted that the food the crew would eat would be locally sourced and raised organically.

After all their prep-work, they descended on our farm on Tuesday; within an hour our farm and home were transformed into a movie set.  The magnitude of equipment, people, props for making a movie were staggering, even one considered “low budget” such as this film.  I had left that afternoon to deliver our first CSA shares of cheese, bread and gelato to our members in Bloomington and when I returned that evening, the sign at the entrance to our farm had been removed and in its place read “Prairie Organic Farms.” I have to admit their sign looked a lot more professional than ours. 

Danny Glover became the “farmer” at Prairie Organic Farms.  We taught him how to feed hay and grain to our goat kids and how to hang a milk bucket feeder on the fence line and hold it in place while all the kids mobbed a single bucket—six nipples for 20 plus kids makes for a milk mob nightmare.  I should mention that this scene was shot at about 9:30PM!  The kids had already bedded down, and initially, were thrilled with the idea of evening milk, until they realized it was only one bucket feeder and they could only drink for a minute. 

The next day’s shoot involved weeding a field.  Wes was cast as an extra and had to give the hired actors who were cast as field hands a lesson in identifying the plants you want to kill and the ones you want to keep.  He also had to show them how to hold a hoe.  When they started shooting the scene, several people remarked that one of the guys hoeing weeds really looked authentic. That was Wes. 

As someone living the realities of trying to farm sustainably in a world of agriculture fraught with compromises and hidden costs, I appreciate the film folks’ attempts to shed light on how America grows its food and how deep the chasm has grown between farmers and consumers.  I appreciate the difficulties in telling a story, trying to stay true to the core values, but needing to fictionalize parts to make the story more compelling.  It’s just hard to bite my tongue when I want the reality of what we do to be the main attraction. 

Farmers’ Markets

We’re attending two farmers’ markets this weekend: Urbana’s Market at the Square and Chicago’s Green City Market.  The weather should be gorgeous, so come out to shop and get some great spring produce. Our cheese repertoire is growing and we’re bidding farewell to the last of our aged sheep milk cheeses and fall milk raw milk cheeses:

  • Fresh Chevre: plain, herbs de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Fresh goat milk ricotta
  • Last of the brine-aged sheep milk feta—REALLY!
  • A full house of bloomy rind cheeses: Baby angel food, little bloom on the prairie, black goat
  • Moonglo—last of the fall milk batches, dry texture but complex flavor—perfect for shaving on roasted asparagus.
  • Eldon: the last wheels of our sheep milk blue-I tasted some yesterday and it seems to be getting better with age—come try it at the market.

Our gelato flavors reflect the classics and the spring (* indicates the local flavors we’re bringing to Green City Market):

  • Chocolate
  • Vanilla
  • Hazelnut
  • Fresh Mint*
  • Local Strawberry*

As June looms on the horizon, we’ll be putting our attention on summer open houses and our “Fork in the Road” tasting trail series. Stay tuned for more details about these events next week.  Happy local food eating.


 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/29/2014 1:13pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Just want to remind folks that our open house will be held this afternoon from 4:00 to 6:30pm.

We have cheese for you to sample and buy. We've got gelato by the scoop and pints to take home. We're also doing something special today with gelato--make your own sundaes!!  

Tomahnous Farm will be here with spring produce, plants and flowers.

Stewart's Artisan Breads will be here with his usual assortment of bagels, breads, cookies, pastries and granola.  

Come on out and see the goats, sit in the shade, enjoy a sultry early summer afternoon on the farm. We hope to see you here!

 


 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/26/2014 11:40am by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Hello CSA members:
This is your email reminder that our CSA begins this week.  We have pick ups tomorrow, Tuesday, May 27th for both Bloomington locations:
4:30 to 5:30 pm at the St. Luke Union Church  2101 E Washington St, Bloomington, IL 61701 (with PrairieErth Farm CSA)
6:00 to 7:00 pm at the Unitarian Church on Emerson St. Bloomington (with Henry Brockman's CSA).

Our farm CSA pickup this week only will be held on Thursday May 29th from 4:00 to 6:30 pm during our Farm Open House time.  You all should have received my email last week explaining why we had to move the day from its usual Wednesday afternoon to Thursday afternoon. All subsequent farm pickups will be held on alternate Wednesdays.

As I mentioned last week, if you are unable to come in person to pick up your shares, please have someone else pick up for you. Please email me to let me know who your substitute is and provide me with their phone number so I can reach them if they forget to pick up.  If no one comes by to pick by the end of the allotted time, I will attempt to call you or your friend and stay if you are on your way to the pick up location.


Our policy for no-shows that haven't given me advance notice is that you forfeit that week's shares.

Also, I will always bring extras of cheese and gelato if you would like to get products in addition to your bi-weekly shares. 

Please let me know if you have any questions. I look forward to seeing you all this week.

 

 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/22/2014 11:21pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

This year, we decided to try our hand at raising turkeys for our 100 Yard Dinner. I’ve always been intrigued by turkeys, especially the striking heritage breeds such as Narragansett and Bourbon Reds.  I’ve admired them from a distance on other farms; their grandeur, their poise.  So, when we decided to raise turkeys, I was both fearful and curious.  They are poultry, but they are different from chickens.  Meat chickens, unlike laying hens, are not bred for longevity.  They eat, they grow, they get eaten; all within a span of no longer than two to three months.  Although we have raised a breed of chicken called the “Freedom Ranger,” a bird designed for foraging and thriving on pasture, they still live a brief (albeit pastoral and happy—or so I’d like to believe) life.

Turkeys, in contrast, live longer and seem to have a slightly greater awareness of the humans who care for them.  I admit that this impression is borne solely from observing other farmers’ turkeys, the beautiful ones who roam freely and greet visitors who arrive at the farm.  I haven’t really known any industrial turkeys—the large white ones with large breasts whose reputation for intelligence does not put them at the top of their class. After researching our options for breeds (white ones were ruled out immediately), we decided on the Bronze.

We consulted with several of our farmer friends who have raised several breeds of turkey, and all agreed that heritage breeds can be challenging and high maintenance, especially for the uninitiated.  The Bronze is a hybrid turkey. It retains some of the genetics of the heritage breeds, but it is more domesticated, is less subject to flight and has stronger instinct for self-preservation.  They also tend to grow a little faster (not quite as fast as the white ones) than the heritage breeds. 

Our day-old turkey chicks arrived yesterday in the mail—all 15 of them. I love getting the early morning phone call from the guy on the night shift at the post office letting you know you have a box of peeping chicks that need to be picked up. Sometimes you can hear the chirping chicks in the background of the phone call.  Wes picked them up, brought them back to the farm and we put them under heat lamps in our “kid newborn pen.”  Wes dipped each one’s beak in water so they would know how to drink.  Once they realized their newfound freedom, they began to explore their environment. Unlike chicken chicks, they exude an air of confidence. They don’t seem to be afraid to venture away from each other to explore.  Within minutes of being released from their box, one of the chicks found an ant, and proceeded to eat it!!  Only two days old, and already foraging for bugs—that’s my kind of poultry.  I’ve been smitten.  Move over Freedom Rangers.

turkey chicks

Farmers’ Markets

This Saturday, May 24th, we’ll be attending the Urbana Farmers’ Market only. We’ll be there from 7AM to 12 noon. Come see us. The weather should be FINE!! We’ve got some GREAT cheese for you to try and take home:

  • Fresh Chevre 
  • Fresh Goat Milk Ricotta—this delicate fresh cheese is begging to paired with some fresh peas, mint and olive oil
  • An assortment of Bloomy Rind cheeses including Little Bloom on the Prairie AND Black Goat (it’s back in all its tangy-yeasty glory)
  • Sheep Milk Feta—very little left, still tasting amazing
  • Moonglo-raw goat milk tomme that is perfect shaved over some roasted asparagus
  • Huckleberry Blue—our sweet and savory goat milk blue is ideal for crumbling on a salad or a spring pizza

If you haven’t tried our goat milk gelato this season, the weather is finally heating up for pints of:

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Honey Chevre
  • Rhubarb Crème
  • Pistachio (very limited quantities)

Other Farm News & Events

Our mid-week Summer Open House season started this past Wednesday (yesterday), but the thunderstorms kept many folks away. Next week, we will host our Open House on Thursday, May 29th from 4:00-6:30pm. We are hosting a movie crew out here on Wednesday, so the farm won’t be open to the public.  We’ll be doing a very special gelato tasting on Thursday, so stay tuned for the details. 

There are still dinner tickets available for sale through our ShowClix page.  You can read the descriptions on our website or just go directly to the ShowClix page. We will posting sales for our first “Fork in the Road” Tasting Trail with K&D Ranch and Sleepy Creek Vineyards soon. The first tasting trail tour will be held in June. I’ll be sending out an announcement in the next week with details about how to sign up. 



Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/19/2014 9:59pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 21ST, FROM 4:00 TO 6:30 PM, we will open our doors to the public for the start of our summer farm open house season.  Each Wednesday, from now until the first week of September, you can come out to the farm, visit with the goats, stroll the grounds, eat some gelato and buy some great local foods.  There's no admission charge, and no reservations are required.  Just come and enjoy the rural beauty that surrounds us.

This Wednesday, we're featuring our cheeses:

  • Fresh chevre
  • Fresh ricotta
  • Sheep milk feta
  • An assortment of bloomy rind cheeses
  • Moonglo and Huckleberry Blue

Gelato Featured Flavors include (both scoops and pints):

  • Chocolate
  • Vanilla
  • Honey Chevre
  • Rhubarb Creme

Tomahnous Farm will be here with salad mix, spinach, asparagus, herb plants, pansies, and more.  

Laurence Mate, aka the "Knife Dude" will be here to sharpen your knives while you shop and visit with the goats. 

We look forward to seeing you here.

 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/16/2014 7:39am by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

As our kidding season appears to have come to an end (it seems that four does that should have been bred are not pregnant), I reflect on the birthing episodes that will likely stick in my mind for some time to come. On a Sunday morning nearly three weeks ago, I was not around. Wes was doing his usual Sunday morning milking and found one of our yearling first fresheners, Magda, in labor with a kid stuck in the birth canal.  One leg was out and no head was visible. I am usually the one to extract these difficult kids, but Wes was on his own this time. He managed to get the other leg out, but not the head. After struggling to insert his large hands in the birth canal to adjust the neck and head, he worried that too much time had elapsed and that the kid might be dead. In the interest of saving the mother, he pulled. The kid emerged, limp and seemingly lifeless; barely four pounds in weight.  He put the tiny doeling aside to deliver the healthy, normal-presentation buckling waiting in the wings.  While checking in the brother, he noticed that the doeling was breathing.  He and the kidding volunteer (Magdalena) got a warm bottle of colostrum into her mouth, and although she couldn’t lift her head, she clutched onto the nipple and drank.  This was the first sign of her tenacious personality. 

After the first 24 hours, it was obvious that she couldn’t stand because her shoulder was dislocated.  We brought her to the vet and they wrapped her little leg in a bandage to immobilize the shoulder. Not having walked yet, attempting to stand with only three legs proved impossible. Back to the vet for a cast so she could put weight on her injured leg.  She struggled to right her little body in this cast and could not lift herself up for a few days. This didn’t stop her from eating and screaming for attention. Within days, she was downing a full bottle of milk.  We worked her body and legs to build strength, and after nearly one week in the cast, she could stand by herself.

The cast came off and while wobbly, she was able to stand on her own and walk. She would fall down often, but pick herself up and try to follow us around the barn.  As the week progressed, her legs and confidence grew stronger, and she started to run and prance around the barn.  During feeding times, she’d scream for attention, down her full bottle of milk and gallop around the barn as we fed the other kids, cleaned water buckets and went about our normal kid feeding chores.  When the week post-cast was up, I put her back in the pen with her mates.  She fell in with the group immediately and rushed to the bucket feeder with the rest of them, all four feet planted firmly on the ground.  Magda 123, almost left for dead, joined the ranks of our boisterous kids-our miracle baby. 

Farmers’ Markets

This Saturday, May 17th, we’ll be attending two farmers’ markets: Urbana’s Market at the Square and Chicago’s Green City Market.  We’ve got some beautiful spring cheeses for you to enjoy:

  • Fresh chevre—bright, lemony, fluffy—what more can I say? The chevre screams SPRING!!: pain, herbs de Provence and cracked peppercorn
  • Experimental Angel Food: Our small, delicate bloomy rounds are fully of ooey gooey flavor
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie: camembert in style, this bloomy rind disc has a firm paste in the center slight gooey-ness around the edges
  • Sheep milk feta: this is the last batch of feta, so get it while it lasts
  • Moonglo: raw milk cheese made last fall—sharp, full of flavor
  • Huckleberry Blue: raw goat milk blue, perfect for a spring salad of beets

Wes was busy spinning gelato this week. We’ve got some new flavors as well as the regulars (* indicates flavors that will be at Green City Market as well as Urbana):

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Margot’s Fresh Mint *
  • Honey Chevre *
  • Rhubarb Crème *
  • Ginger

Come out to the market to try these and take home a pint. 

Food on the Farm Just a quick reminder that dinner tickets go on sale today at 12 noon and our first Pop-Up event is this evening from 5:30-7:30.  Details for both can be found on our website under “Food on the Farm.” 



Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/13/2014 10:28pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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As farm "reminder in chief," I'd like to bring back to your attention a few upcoming events and deadlines:

First, our "New Orleans" themed pop-up event is scheduled for this coming Friday, May 16th from 5:30 to 7:30pm. NO RESERVATIONS required.  We'll be serving local chicken and sausage gumbo, muffaletta sandwiches, andouille po boys, savory corn beignets for the vegetarians, bread pudding for dessert and sweet tea and Homer sodas.  New Orleans Jazz Band will be here to serenade you. BYOB.

Second, sales for our mid-summer, early fall farm dinners go on sale Friday May 16th at 12 noon.  To review the dates and the themes, please visit our website "2014 Dinner Season." To access the dates and the reservations,(July 26th-September 20th), please visit our Showclix Page.  

Third, our first summer farm open house will be Wednesday, May 21st from 4:00-6:30 pm.  Stay tuned for details about this event and the summer open houses in general.

 

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/9/2014 7:46am by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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What’s in a name?

We’re drawn to naming things; naming creatures, naming each other, giving nicknames, real names, pseudonyms.  We give names to our goat kids as they’re born—they get their mother’s name and a birth number. This is a very latin approach to naming (taking both the mother’s and father’s names).  We don’t decide their true names until we decide who we’re keeping. This doesn’t refrain us from giving them nicknames—fuzz ball for the really furry Katie baby, zebra for the Zora baby—you get the picture. 

Of course, we name our cheeses too. As American artisan cheese makers, we’re not burdened by European rules of protected denominations based on milk types and regions.  We can take basic recipes for cheeses (tomme, bloomy rind, etc.), spin them to suit our milk or farmstead environment and call our cheese creation whatever we like. I often chuckle when someone comes to our stand at the farmers’ market and looks at our chalk board list of cheeses and remarks, “Oh, what’s ‘Moonglo?’ I’ve never heard of that cheese.”  So it goes with our cheese “Angel Food,” a goats’ milk brie style cheese. We’ve decided to experiment with new shapes and techniques for making this cheese this season, and we’ve received some interesting feedback.  We’ve discovered that some of our customers have very strong feelings for the original version of Angel Food (a 3 inch disc, ½ inch thick with gooey interior and white mold rind). “Don’t change it!” they insisted. Other folks embraced our new version after tasting it.  Still, others didn’t even notice the change and just recognized the name and bought it. 

new labels

 

We’ve also changed our farm name (legally that is) from Prairie Fruits Farm, LLC to Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC to acknowledge in a legal sense the important and critical  business role of our dairy and farmstead creamery. We’ve changed our logo too, our packaging---lots of changes this year. Like our goats, many people are averse to change or confused by change. Several people who stopped by our stand didn’t realize that we were Prairie Fruits Farm initially (until they tasted our chevre and then it all came flooding back to them).  Lots of folks commented on our new packaging—most folks liked the new look; a few pined for the original design.  Names are important; names have meaning attached to them.    Names are loaded with emotion. I have to remember this.

Farmers’ Markets and Food on the Farm

We’re attending one farmers’ market this Saturday, May 10th: Urbana’s Market on the Square.  We’ll be there from 7-12 with lots of cheese and some gelato:

Fresh chevre—plain, herbs de Provence, cracked pepper

Fresh goat milk ricotta: It’s BAACK!! what better way to celebrate spring and mother’s day with a pizza topped with our fresh ricotta!

Experimental bloomy—another version of our NEW Angel Food—check it out and let us know what you think

Little Bloom on the Prairie—these camembert-style  rounds are young,  but quite tasty. You can enjoy them young, or let them age for a  week in your refrigerator.

Sheep milk feta: We’re dipping into our last two buckets of well-aged feta, so if you’re loving this complex feta, come and get it. We won’t be making more feta this year.  It is keeping remarkably well.

Moonglo: The last of our late fall batches, this cheese is tart, somewhat dry and great for shaving or grating over some of those fresh spring asparagus you’re finding at the markets.

Huckleberry Blue: our raw goat milk blue cheese whose rind was cloaked in a pear-brandy-soaked sycamore leaf—very approachable for a blue cheese.

We will have a limited offering of gelato this Saturday:

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Honey Chevre
  • Margot’s Mint

More Food on the Farm

We’re launching a new food venture at the farm this year. We’re calling it “Third Fridays Pop Up.” The third Friday of every month, we’re opening our doors for a simple (and delicious, but that goes without saying) special-themed meal on the farm. You can enjoy live music too. No reservations are required!   NEXT Friday May 16th; 5:30 to 7:30 PM Enjoy local jazz musicians New Orleans Jazz Machine play on the farm from 5:30 to 7:30 pm. Our chefs will be pedaling dishes from the Big Easy, including:  

  • Local chicken and sausage gumbo
  • Muffaletta sandwiches
  • Andouille Po Boys
  • Savory corn beignets for the vegetarians
  • Bread pudding for dessert
  • Sweet tea and Homer sodas

All items are priced a la carte and first-come- first-serve. Children are welcome. BYOB. Bring chairs or blankets if you'd like to sit outside.  

In addition to this new food event, we still have a few seats open for our Sunday Dinner Club Memorial Day weekend Dinner and our June 14th Wild Game Dinner through our  "Dinners on the Farm Series.”  Also, We’ll be opening reservations to the next five dinner dates on Friday, May 16th at 12 noon, so mark your calendars.  Stay tuned for postings about future events. We’re planning a  lot of exciting opportunities to dine on the farm this coming season!



Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 5/1/2014 9:37pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

May Day, May 1st; the day we celebrate the labors of workers around the world.  We celebrate the folks who toil tirelessly in unglamorous jobs. We salute the farmers and farm workers whose sweat puts food on our tables.  Here at Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, we raise a glass to our own cadre of workers—our wonderful staff who milk the goats, till & plant the fields, shovel the goat manure, make the cheese, wash all those dishes and prepare the beautiful foods that come out of our farm kitchen. 

I would be remiss if I don't recognize our caprine workers; our dairy goats. Day in, day out, twice daily for ten months out of the year, they line themselves up to come into the milking parlor to give up their milk to a set of inflations.  I won’t say they do this without some complaining—some complain quite a bit, especially the first fresheners.  Once habituated to their routine, they fall in line.  Without their willingness to produce baby goats every year and then, produce milk for us to transform into cheese, gelato and other dairy products, our farm would be a ship with no sail. Thank you goat workers!  More grain for you in the parlor tomorrow morning!

First Farmers’ Markets of the Season

This Saturday, May 3rd, is the first outdoor market in Urbana and Chicago’s Green City Market. We’ll be attending both markets with plenty of cheese and gelato. Come visit us from 7-12 in Urbana and 7-1pm in Lincoln Park (Chicago).

For cheese, we’ll have:

Fresh chevre: plain, herbs de Provence, cracked black peppercorn

Sheep milk feta: try our feta on roasted asparagus or sauteed spring greens

An experimental bloomy rind cheese (it might become the new Angel Food, so let us know what you think)

Moonglo: it’s sharp, it’s tangy, it’s a perfect accompaniment to your favorite jam or shave it on some roasted spring veggies

Eldon (sheep milk blue): crumble it on a spring salad and rejoice!

Huckleberry Blue (our raw, goat milk blue): the first of our fall goat milk blue cheeses wrapped in pear brandy-soaked sycamore leaves—dense and rich, it’s plain yummy

Gelato Flavors 

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Ginger
  • Honey Chevre (this is only flavor that will travel north to Chicago as it’s the only local ingredients flavor we have right now)

We look forward to greeting our market patrons. The weather should be perfect-we’ll see you there. 



Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 4/30/2014 3:11pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Spring Brunch on the Farm

We've got seats still available for our spring brunches: May 3rd and May 10th.  We have amazing menus planned for each event including elaborate egg dishes, sumptuous pastries and  platters of cheeses.  The deadline for sign up for this weekend's brunch is 9:30 AM tomorrow. With a start time of 10:30 AM you'll have plenty of time to shop the farmers' market, drop off your groceries at home and head on over to the farm to enjoy some fresh from the farm spring cooking.  The deadline for sign-up for the May 10th brunch is Monday, May 5th.  

For more details and links to our show clix reservations pages, go to our website's Food on the Farm section.

Cheese Bread and Gelato CSA

The deadline for sign up for our CSA (biweekly pickups from late May through mid-November) is Friday, May 9th. You can sign up for several cheese options as well as breads from Stewart's Artisan Breads. We also offer one or two pints of gelato per pickup.  As a special bonus, members can sign up for a CSA members only dinner on the farm.  Check out the details.

Copyright 2014 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2014. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.