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Posted 12/1/2016 9:27pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

December brings less light. December brings cold winds. December wears a shade of grey that makes you pull your hood up. The goats’ coats stand on end every morning as they wait in the cold damp dark air of the morning milking shift.  They are increasingly reluctant to give up the paltry ounces of white liquid “gold” that their udders contain.  We are increasingly resentful to awaken in the dark to extract their liquid gold.  Yet, the richness of their milk and the denseness of the curd in the vat keep us going, keep us coaxing the pregnant goat girls a little bit longer. 

December is the month of milker attrition. Each week, another few does decide they have had enough and dry themselves off.  Last week, we had a group of 11 does who handed us their “pink slips.”  The good news is we know this is a clear sign that they are bred and shifting their resources to the next generation.  The onset of winter celebrates the culmination of a season of cheese making; it’s a time of people gathering together to enjoy the fruits of labors endured in the heat of summer.  December begins the transition from work to rest.  Goats and farmers alike are not putting up a fight. 

2017 CSA Season is ready for sign up

If you love our cheeses, and want to get in on our special “members only” benefits, please consider signing up for our 2017 Cheese and Gelato CSA season.  We offer members lots of options and flexibility. You can choose the quantities and types of cheese you want. We also offer special “members only” cheeses throughout the season (this year, we made special chevre flavors including ramp pesto, a coffee flavored bloomy rind called “mocha” and a pepper infused Moonglo).  The gelato share offers you one or two pints of gelato every two weeks. 

Members also have the option to sign up for a meat, poultry and egg share from Bane Family Meats and a special CSA members’ farm harvest dinner in the fall.  For 2017, we have pick up locations in Champaign-Urbana and Bloomington-Normal. Sign up now through December 15th, and get a 10% discount off the season.  If you sign up between December 16th and February 27th, you get a 5% discount off the season.  We also have a link to the Delight Flower CSA sign up. They will offer a pick up at our farm next year as well.

What’s New in the Real Stand at Prairie Fruits Farm?

We had a fantastic turnout last Saturday for the Holiday Goat Parade. This weekend, we’re encouraging folks to visit the farm on Sunday, December 4th (10 AM to 5 PM) to unwind a bit.  We’re calling the event “Treat Yourself at the Farm:” https://www.facebook.com/events/1732839123709718/ Back by popular demand, we will be dressing up several yearlings in holiday attire for guests to pose with for pictures. We’ll also show you how to give goat facials; they go into a trance and you relax just watching them! We will have several Delight Flower Farm wreaths made with all-local greenery for sale.

We will also offer warm beverages (with and without alcohol) to warm your insides, and Rueben’s Chocolates will make their debut at The Real Stand with fine chocolates—goat cheese truffles, petit prunes (from the Jarrell Family Farm in Oregon) dipped in dark chocolate and even our famous salted goat milk caramels will be available for tasting and for purchase. 

Also new in the shop: herbal teas and bath care products from Delight Flower Farm, new soaps made with our goat milk from Red Barn Farm and grass-fed lamb from Caveny Farm (ground and shoulder steaks available). We also have eggs, meat and poultry from Bane Family Meats, Elk Summer Sausage from KD Ranch and Artisan Sausages from Piemonte Sausage Co.  Cheese, jams, pickles, candied pecans and other farm treats will be available for tasting and purchase as well.  Of course we have gorgeous hand-crafted art work from Lara Orr and Cara Cummings. Lastly, don’t forget the PFF&C “Merch:” t-shirts, tea towels, onesies and hoodies, oh my! Although the forecast is calling for possibility of our first SNOW, we will keep you warm and relaxed out at the farm.

Farmers’ Market Happenings

Don’t forget that the Urbana “Market in the Square” is VERY MUCH ALIVE and happening every Saturday through December 17th. We will be there this Saturday from 8 AM to 1 PM with cheese, jams, crackers, nuts and some gelato.  Here’s the lineup of cheeses:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herbs de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Raw –Milk Feta: don’t neglect this cheese just because it’s cold outside-crumble feta on a bowl of chili or a hearty stew and you’ll elevate your meal to a whole new stratosphere
  • Snow Fog: our next batch of cow milk “camembert” style cheese is young but beautifully dense and fudgy-quite tasty
  • Moonglo: our raw milk tomme-style cheese made in the heat of the summer captures the essence of the pasture forage in mid-lactation milk
  • Magia Negra: our homage to Manchego (goat style) is crumbly, sharp and nutty—perfect for shaving on a winter salad
  • Goat Milk Yogurt: get it while it lasts; just milk and live cultures—don’t need anything else

Looking for a gift certificate?  Consider a gift card with our “Credibles” Account-it’s a great way to support our farm and let your gift recipients use it whenever and however they like. If you’re looking for a customized gift certificate for the 2017 Farm-to-Table Meal Season, please email me at prairiefruits@gmail.com

Concert at the Prairie Glass House—our friends at Lumen Events are hosting “Acoustic Christmas” on December 10th, featuring Rebecca Rego and the Trainmen. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery will be crafting the holiday cheese platters for this event. Get your tickets NOW! https://www.facebook.com/events/1824221074488987oat 

 


Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 11/25/2016 2:08pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News
I love Thanksgiving on the farm. I love cooking the food we source from the local farms around us or from the garden beds we tended earlier this year. We spent most of the day prepping the meal, including roasting our bird over a wood fire. Our feast included a turkey raised by Bane Family Meats in Sidney, IL, salad greens and fennel from Blue Moon Farm in Urbana, braising greens and fresh herbs from our own garden, eggs from our own hens, corn meal from Spence Farm in Fairbury and fruits for the pie from our own orchard.  Something about taking the turkey off the grill in the cool damp air of late November pushes me back in time, but the flavors of the feast were ever so present on my palate.  

Holiday Goat Parade-November 26th 10 AM-5 PM

We're opening up the farm tomorrow (Saturday) for a special event we're calling "Holiday Goat Parade." It will be an open house format, so come whenever you like (between the hours of 10 AM and 5 PM). We are dressing up several of our favorite goats in holiday attire and they will be "parading" around the farm all day.  We will have hot beverages (even some goat milk hot chocolate) for you to drink while you shop or walk around the farm and visit with the goats. We will have a photo taking spot just outside the farm shop, so you can pose with family members and take holiday pictures with or without our "holiday" goats.  

We have lots of GREAT gifts inside our shop-THE REAL STAND-made by local artisans (food and non-food) and our PFF&C "merch," as well as samples of cheese and gelato for you to try.  Delight Flower Farm will be here making and selling holiday wreaths.  The weather forecast sounds delightful for this time of year (sunny and in the 50's), so we hope you'll stop by and get a jumpstart on some holiday cheer, farm style. 


Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 11/17/2016 10:30pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

Last night, I had the pleasure of teaching an eager group of folks about cheese.  As a person perpetually immersed of the world of cheese, from making it to selling it, I realize how valuable it is to spend a few hours talking about cheese with those who love to eat it, but consider it a mystery food.  Cheese is a magical thing; born of a milky suspension teeming with microbes and molecules, it is transformed to a myriad of textures, aromas and flavors. The hands of the cheesemaker guide the chosen microbes and enzymes, with a little heat and a curd knife, to rearrange the molecules of milk into solids (curd) and liquid (whey). The different species of lactating animals, the feed that they eat, the seasonality of the milk and the air that permeates the creamery aging spaces all impact the finished product we call “cheese.” No wonder it is so mysterious and intimidating to the general public. 

When we Americans abandoned our European ancestors’ cheese traditions for the glamour of industrial foods, we lost our comfort and our vocabulary for understanding and appreciating cheese.  Kraft singles and powdered parmesan in a can ruined the palates of several generations.  With the renaissance of American artisan cheeses, we are re-awakening our taste buds and craving an understanding of the strange and stinky rounds and wedges appearing at our grocery stores and our farmers’ markets. 

Under the glow of the lights in our barn dining room, wine glasses and baguette rounds at our side, we dove into the cheese spectrum laid before us. Starting with the fresh chevre and mozzarella, we glided into the bloomy rinds, progressed to the mild semi-hard, moved on the aged, semi-hard and hard raw milks and ended with a blue cheese and a brine-aged feta. I gave my eager pupils a brief lesson on how to use all of their senses to evaluate the cheeses and armed them with a few vocabulary words to help them describe what they were tasting. By the end of the evening, I could feel their confidence rise.  Several tried cheeses they swore they would never touch, while others invoked analogies to food tastes I never would have considered.  I’d like to think I pulled back the black curtain and let their black and white cheese world segue into Technicolor. 

Holiday Markets

With the waning super moon, we welcome in the Thanksgiving Holiday. It’s one of my favorite holidays, because it celebrates the achievements of our agricultural escapades. The holiday farmers’ markets reflect the culmination of all our farmers’ hard work in growing beautiful and diverse crops and raising tasty meats humanely.  We are attending three markets this Saturday, November 19th: Urbana’s Market in the Square (inside Lincoln Square Mall-8-1), Bloomington’s Holiday Market (in the Coliseum, 10-12) and Chicago’s Green City Market (inside the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 8-1).  Not only are we bringing lots of wonderful cheeses to adorn your holiday tables, but we’ll have all the accompaniments (jams, spiced toasted pecans, crackers, pickles) that you need to make the perfect local cheese boards for you and your guests

Here’s the line- up of cheeses:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herbs de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Raw milk feta: crumbly and tangy, you can dress it up for the holidays with a drizzle of good olive oil and some fresh cut herbs
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie: our goat milk camembert-style is rich and creamy this time of year
  • Snow Fog: our jersey cow-milk bloomy rind-dense, fudgy with hints of mushroom from the rind
  • Prairie Jersey Apple: our “experimental” batch of a jersey cow milk washed-rind cheese; we washed the rind with a hard cider. Although this batch is more toothsome than we intended, we’re happy with the flavor and we wanted our market patrons to give it a try
  • Moonglo: semi-hard, raw-milk, this cheese is combination of sharpness and fruitiness
  • Magia Negra: modeled after a manchego-style cheese, this one will grab you with its nuttiness
  • Goat milk yogurt: we made a special batch of yogurt for the holiday markets-plain and simple in pints and quarts-come and get it!

We will be bringing an assortment of gelato to the markets as well. Flavors include (not all markets will have all of these flavors):

  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Lemon Verbena
  • Bourbon Caramel Apple
  • Salted Caramel Swirl (very limited)
  • Blackberry Cream
  • Local Ginger
  • Bourbon Peach Sorbetto
  • Local Grape Sorbetto

Farm Happenings

We had a great turnout for the opening of our holiday farm market “The Real Stand.” The farm will be open tomorrow (Friday, Nov. 18th) and again on Sunday, (Nov. 20th) from 10-5 each day. We have cheese, jams, pickles, crackers, gelato, yogurt, eggs, meats, local yarn, goat milk soaps, beautiful hand-made gifts from local artists, lots and lots of “merch”—t-shirts, sweatshirts, onesies, tea towels, aprons, OH MY!  The shop is all dressed up for the holidays and very festive, so we hope you’ll come check it out.

We are closed during the week of Thanksgiving, but we re-open on Saturday November 26th for a special event: “Goat Holiday Parade.” Come out to the farm (10 AM to 5 PM), peruse our farm shop and take pictures with goats dressed in “holiday attire.” It’s a great venue for holiday pictures (who could resist seeing your family alongside our little caprine Santa and elf goats)! Wine, beer and warm beverages will be available as well as samples of our cheeses. 

The Real Stand regular hours will be Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Sundays 10-5, unless noted otherwise. 

Our friends from Delight Flower Farm are making special holiday wreaths (that we are selling at our farm stand) are making gorgeous wreaths. Here are the details on how to get your hands on one:

"We're reminding you to place this year's wreath order by Nov 25th. We will be harvesting greens and "elving" over the Thanksgiving holiday week, so we need to know how many wreaths we're making. Holiday Wreaths: Small (12"/$25) and large (18"/$35). To place your order email delightCSA@gmail.com by Nov 25th. Include the number of how many of each size wreath you'd like (these make nice gifts!) Pickup for locals starts Dec 2nd at the Mistletoe Market, but we can ship to you and your loved ones too! ***Our wreath greens and berries are locally-sourced, and each one is handmade with its' own unique style- from traditional to weird and wild. :)

Also, reminding you of these upcoming farm-related dates/events:

Cut Flower CSA membership for summer 2017: We are already accepting shareholders for this coming flower season. In fact, your early enrollment will save you money and help us with our early-season expenses (bulbs, potting soil, seeds, tools, etc.) We have several pricing brackets for CSA membership depending upon when you enroll. Sign up early! ('til Dec 31st) CSA shares make good gifts because they keep on giving throughout the year. Consider giving a CSA share to one of your loved ones this year! We even have fancy little gift cards you can give them to "unwrap"!

Imbibe Urbana:: Mistletoe Market: Dec 2nd, 4-8pm, Urbana Civic Center. We'll be here with lots of other "kissable" Urbana folks (+ cocktails + kids crafts). We're really excited to have winter farm products to sell this year including our farm-grown tea blends, Liz's herbal body products and medicines, beeswax fire starters, wreaths, paper white blooming (!) winter bulbs, and more. What fun! "

 


Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 11/11/2016 8:46am by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

"I prefer winter and fall, when you feel the bone structure of the landscape - the loneliness of it,  the dead feeling of winter.  Something waits beneath it, the whole story doesn't show."  -   Andrew Wyeth

This week, events outside the sphere of the farm have consumed us. Sometimes these external jolts spark us into a new state of consciousness.  The strength of our flat prairie region is our sense of community.  The wide open landscape, laid bare after crop harvest, has nowhere to hide.  Andrew Wyeth’s words above are particularly poignant for us flatlanders in the autumn of the year. We come together to seek warmth, solace, joy. We know what lies beneath our feet is what sustains us. Just as I embrace the terroir of our prairie in the flavor of our milk and the taste of our cheese, I celebrate the terroir of our community in its tenacity to the ground and to each other.

Farming, especially farming with animals, has taught me the humble lessons of not having control over most things.  Yet, the optimism of the seasons, that leaves fall, crops get harvested, winter wipes the slate clean and baby goats come in the spring, forces me to reaffirm the value of terroir.

"November always seemed to me the Norway of the year." -   Emily Dickinson

I love this quote from Emily Dickinson.  Does the analogy to November as “Norway” allude to barrenness? Does it salute the power of the glaciers that wiped the landscape clean and built it back up with just enough soil to grow things? (The soil scientist in me would like to believe the latter.) November for me is a time of nesting. It seems counterintuitive to nest in the fall when most creatures nest in the spring.  But my nesting is more in line with the seasonality of goats. As their milk production wanes, I have more time to clean house, to make delicious food.  They are busy making babies.

The long overdue colder temperatures have arrived, and the goats grazing in the windswept pasture scarf up senescent maple leaves like potato chips. The firewood is stacked and covered neatly against the house (the tidy part of this scene doesn’t happen too often), and there’s a fire in our woodstove every morning.  The arrival of early darkness each afternoon makes the goats reluctant to enter the milking parlor and makes me eager to curl up on a chair and read.  I have a long list of books that await me.

Farm Happenings and Market News Fall Classes and Workshops:  

Our November 13th cheese making workshop is sold out, but we have a couple of spaces open for the workshop on December 11th.  We have plenty of spaces still available for our Wednesday evening classes on understanding cheese (November 16th) and cheese pairings (November 30th).  Check out the details and book your spots NOW. All classes involve eating lots of cheese and drinking some really great wines and/or beers too. 

Our holiday farm shop is taking shape. We’ve been working hard on renovations and plan to have a “soft” opening on Wednesday, November 16th from 3-6PM. Stay tuned for details and regular hours as well as special events we plan to host at the farm for the holiday season.

Farmers' Markets

This Saturday, we move inside Lincoln Square Mall, Urbana, for the “Market in the Square.” The market runs from 8AM to 1:00 PM and we will be located just inside the south entrance to the mall (near Tang Dynasty and the former ArtMart).  NEXT SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19TH, WE ARE ATTENDING THREE PRE-THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY MARKETS-URBANA, BLOOMINGTON, GREEN CITY MARKET.

Of course, this we have cheese:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine; tangy and crumbly, it compliments any roasted fall vegetables you care to try it with. 
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style-slightly firm this week, but loaded with flavor; last batch of the season, so better get some now.
  • Black Goat: our ash-ripened bloomy rind-deliciously gooey this week. This is the last batch of the season, so get it while it lasts.
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish.
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors.

We have lots of creamy gelato flavors too-perfect for sharing with friends:

  • Pumpkin
  • Chocolate
  • Spiced Butter Pecan
  • Vanilla
  • Lemon Verbena
  • Blackberry Cream
  • Masala Chai Tea
  • Bourbon Caramel Apple
  • Espresso
  • Honey Peanut Brittle
  • Gingersnap Crumble
  • Salted Caramel Swirl
  • Local Ginger
  • Hazelnut
  • Bourbon Peach Sorbetto
  • Local Grape-Cava Sorbetto

Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 11/3/2016 9:19pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

I continue to be amazed by the degree to which human lives are intertwined with goats. Yes, our agrarian ties go back millennia. Yes, most cultures across all continents derive a multitude of benefits from their husbandry: milk, fiber, meat, companionship.  These human-caprine relationships are marvelous but expected.  Even the quotidian yet intimate bonds with our milkers are ordinary in the scheme of dairy farming.

So, I’ve been intrigued by the “curse of the billy goat” that has hung over the Chicago Cubs for over 100 years.  It amazes me that folks kept goats routinely in the city of Chicago back then. Yet, how could a stinky male goat be let into a ball park in the first place?  How could a man-goat relationship hold such weight to provoke a curse on a baseball team? How could this curse exert such power for so long? How could generations of fans hold on to this superstition, some even taking it to their graves?  

I understand superstitions and baseball curses.  I grew up with them, from my old-country grandparents to the bambino curse of my beloved Boston Red Sox.  As the Cubs clinched the National League Playoffs and the World Series were in their sights, the fans began to taunt the goat, to stand up to the curse. We got emails from fraternity boys wanting to bring goats to their frat house.  We got special requests from fans daring to eat goat cheese during the games.  Then, last night happened: nothing short of a miracle (and plenty of grit and moxie from their inspiring team) come-back from losing three games, and pull-out in the 10th inning after a rainstorm to win the game by one run!  We are all Cubs fans today, as we rejoice in the lifting of the billy goat curse.  Chicago, raise your crackers full of chevre with pride! The goat-human bond is restored to its rightful place.

Farm Happenings

The Farm Store at Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery “The Real Stand is now closed as we get to work on renovations and decorating for the holidays. We plan to re-open with a special “soft” opening on Wednesday afternoon, November 16th.  Stay tuned for details as they unfold.

Fall Classes and Workshops:  Spaces are filling up for our cheese making and cheese appreciation classes.  We are offering a couple of all-day cheese making classes and a couple of Wednesday evening workshops on understanding cheese and cheese pairings.  Check out the details and book your spots NOW. The all-day, cheese-making classes (November 13th and December 11th) are limited to 7 participants, and the other classes will involve eating lots of cheese and drinking some really great wines and/or beers too. 

Small Dairy Intensive: We’re partnering with The Land Connection to offer an all-day workshop on starting a small-scale dairy in Illinois (Sunday December 4th). For those of you thinking you’d like to milk cows or goats or even sheep and sell farmstead dairy products (including raw milk) legally and safely in Illinois, this workshop is for you. Most of the presenters are dairy farmers who are already doing it successfully.  Check out the details and register now! Space is limited. 

Market News Saturday, November 5th is the last outdoor market in Urbana. Thereafter, we move inside Lincoln Square Mall for the “Market in the Square.” The weather is shaping up to be a glorious fall day, so come support the farmers who work so hard to bring you the finest produce and local foods in central Illinois.   Here’s the selection of cheeses we have to offer you this weekend:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine; tangy and crumbly, it compliments any roasted fall vegetables you care to try it with. 
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style- young, but starting to get a nice gooey layer on the edges—just how I like it.
  • Black Goat: our ash-ripened bloomy rind is back—fudgy and dense, it’s simply delicious. This is the last batch of the season.
  • Snow Fog: our slow-fermented jersey-milk bloomy rind, made in the style of a chaource (similar to the traditional camembert from Normandy France).  This is our late fall-winter alternative to the goat milk bloomies. It is made differently than our Little Bloom on the Prairie, and the rich yellow Jersey cow milk from Kilgus Farmstead makes a decadently dense bloomy.  We have a few this week, and more to come in subsequent weeks.
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish.
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors.

Gelato: The flavors just keep on coming:

  • Vanilla
  • Lemon verbena
  • Chocolate
  • Bourbon peach sorbetto
  • Blackberry cream
  • Ginger (made with local ginger from Big Thorn Farm in Georgetown IL)
  • Espresso
  • Bourbon Carmel apple (apples from Wolfe Orchard)
  • Salted caramel
  • Hazelnut
  • Local grape sorbetto (made with MI seedless grapes)
  • Pumpkin (from the Great Pumpkin Patch)
  • Toasted coconut - limited
  • Honey peanut brittle - limited
  • Gingersnap - limited 

Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 10/27/2016 9:19pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

Mind over matter; I haven’t really had much time to ponder the significance of this phrase since February.  When the body is in constant motion for months on end, the mind plays tricks on the matter of flesh and bones.  The mind convinces the body that it must keep moving with six hours of sleep. The mind refutes the eyelids’ protestations to stay open when they really want to close. The mind trains the body to ignore those twinges in the lower back when hoisting 50-70 pound coolers full of cheese or gelato into the pick-up for market.  I liken the state of a farmer in season to a shark in the deep blue ocean; we both must keep moving to stay alive. 

When the season starts to loosen its grip (usually happens right about this time of year, as outdoor markets end and the flow of late lactation milk slows to a trickle), the body and mind have time to argue.  It’s time for the bones to talk, to express their fatigue. It’s time for the muscles to grip the flesh, and for the mind to acknowledge the tugging sensation. It’s time to indulge the desire to cook cool-weather soups.  It’s time to resist the urge to jump out of bed when the alarm goes off; eyelids stay closed while the daily news drones on from the bedside radio.   

Farm Happenings

The Farm Store at Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery “The Real Stand”: This is the last weekend for fall open hours.  We are open Friday-Sunday, 1-4 pm October, 28-30. Thereafter, we’ll be closed until the week before Thanksgiving, as we get the shop ready for holiday sales.  We still have lots of great things for you to buy—cheese, gelato, meats, sausages, eggs, cider, goat milk soap.  Come out and enjoy the remnants of fall at the farm. The weather should be nice enough to sit outside and enjoy a scoop of gelato. 

Farm Dinners:  The last dinner of the season, “Fall Feast” on October 29th with Chef Ed Sura (formerly with Perennial Virant, now with NoMi Restaurant-Park-Hyatt, Chicago) still has seats open. THAT'S THIS SATURDAY! Check out the scrumptious menu and book your reservations NOW

Fall Classes and Workshops: We’re always learning here at the farm, and we love to share what we’ve learned with our community. We are offering a couple of all-day cheese making classes and a couple of Wednesday evening workshops on understanding cheese and cheese pairings.  Check out the details and book your spots NOW. The cheese making classes are limited to 7 participants only, and the other classes will involve eating lots of cheese and drinking some really great wines and/or beers too.  We’re almost sold out of the first cheese making class (three spots left), but there are plenty of spaces open for the December class.

Small Dairy Intensive: We’re partnering with The Land Connection to offer an all-day workshop on starting a small-scale dairy in Illinois (Sunday December 4th). For those of you thinking you’d like to milk cows or goats or even sheep and sell farmstead dairy products (including raw milk) legally and safely in Illinois, this workshop is for you. Most of the presenters are dairy farmers who are already doing it successfully.  Check out the details and register now! Space is limited. 

Market News

Saturday, October 29th is the last outdoor market for Green City Market in Chicago. We will be there as well as the Market at the Square in Urbana (which has one more outdoor market before it moves inside Lincoln Square Mall).  We will not return to Green City Market until November 19th, so if you want our cheese, especially the bloomies, act now!   Here’s the selection of cheeses this weekend:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine; tangy and crumbly, it compliments any roasted fall vegetables you care to try it with. 
  • Angel Food— our little bloomy, crottin-style cheese; the last batch of the season.
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style-starting to get a nice gooey layer on the edges—just how I like it.
  • Black Goat: our ash-ripened bloomy rind is back—fudgy and dense, it’s simply delicious. This is the last batch of the season.
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish.
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors.
  • Yogurt: Limited quantities, so come early.

We still have our house-made artisan crackers featuring local grains (milled) from Severson Farm (aka Quality Organics:  herbed flatbread, whole wheat-sesame, blue corn-chevre and oat-chevre. Try a bag with a couple of our cheeses.

Gelato: We still have way too many flavors, and I honestly love them all. We won’t be sending gelato to Green City Market, but Urbana gets the motherlode:

Urbana’s Market at the Square

  • Grape two ways or Grape Cava Sorbetto
  • Peach-Bourbon Sorbetto
  • Pumpkin
  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Espresso
  • Gingersnap
  • Masala chai
  • Toasted coconut
  • Salted caramel swirl
  • Spiced butter pecan
  • Honey peanut brittle
  • Biscotti Crumble (limited

Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 10/20/2016 10:28pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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 Farm News

It is difficult to artificially inseminate a goat.  In the world of production animal medicine, everything is gauged relative to a cow.  With cows, a person can practically put their hand through the cervix and lay the semen straw in the uterus (well, maybe that's a slight exaggeration). Most dairy cows are impregnated artificially these days; pregnancy by bull has become almost obsolete.  With goats, openings are very narrow, and navigating the cervical rings with a very thin sheath takes a steady hand.  Success rates are often less than 50%.

You may be wondering why, if it’s so difficult, we don’t just leave the job of procreation to the bucks.  For the most part, we do. However, there are a few instances when it makes sense for us to try attempt artificial insemination: to bring in new genetics without adding more breeding males and when some of bucks (or bucklings in this case) just aren’t up to the job.  We’ve been keeping several straws of semen under liquid nitrogen deep freeze for these special occasions.

Erica, our herd manager, traveled to Oklahoma a few weeks ago to learn how to artificially inseminate goats. Eager to put her newfound skills to the test, we’ve been watching several doe candidates to catch them when they come into heat.  Yesterday afternoon, we noticed that one of our star milkers, Cecilia, was flagging (does wave their tails vigorously when they’re in heat as a way to attract attention of their betrothed). Since we don’t use any breeding hormones to synchronize our does’ heat cycles, we seized the opportunity to give the straws a try.  As Cecilia nibbled quietly on her grain, Erica deftly inserted the speculum equipped with a mini-light, warmed up the sheath (we women appreciate this added touch), strapped in the semen straw, and attempted to navigate the cervical rings.  

Cecilia eating grain

The cervix has five rings before reaching the opening into the uterus.  From what they tell me, getting the sheath through these rings is akin to driving an alfa romeo on a windy road along the bumpy Italian alps.  You’ve got to slide the sheath over the speed bumps (aka the rings) ever so gently to get the prized deposition spot.  The more rings you can get through, the better chance of the sperm reaching their final destination.  Erica was able to get two straws’ worth lodged successfully. We’ll keep all body parts crossed for the next 21 days and hope for the best.

inserting the sheath

Farm Happenings The Farm Store at Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery “The Real Stand”: We are open Friday- and Sunday, 1-4 pm this weekend, October 21st and 23rd. The store will NOT be open Saturday October 22nd because we are hosting The Land Connection’s Farm Beginnings Class all day that day. We still have lots of great things for you to buy—cheese, gelato, meats, sausages, eggs, cider, goat milk soap.  We just got a fresh shipment of goat milk soaps, so come check them out. The farm will be closed in early November as we get the Farm Store spruced up for the Holiday Season. Stay tuned for details. 

Farm Dinners:  The last dinner of the season, “Fall Feast” on October 29th with Chef Ed Sura (formerly with Perennial Virant, now with NoMi Restaurant-Park-Hyatt, Chicago) still has seats open. Check out the scrumptious menu and book your reservations NOW.

Fall Classes and Workshops: Now that the weather has cooled off and we’re not quite so busy, we are offering a couple of all-day cheese making classes and a couple of Wednesday evening workshops on understanding cheese and cheese pairings.  Check out the details and book your spots NOW. The cheese making classes are limited to 7 participants only, and the other classes will involve eating lots of cheese and drinking some really great wines and/or beers too.  We’re almost sold out of the first cheese making class (three spots left), but there are plenty of spaces open for the December class.

Market News It’s shaping up to be a gorgeous cool fall day on Saturday, so come out and support your farmers. We will be attending two markets this Saturday: Urbana’s Market at the Square, and Chicago’s Green City Market.  There are only two outdoor markets left for Chicago and three for Urbana. For those of you in Bloomington-Normal, we won’t be returning to the outdoor market, but we plan to be there for the “Pre-Thanksgiving” indoor market on November 19th.   Here’s the selection of cheeses this weekend:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine; although you may think feta season is over, think again. Feta is a great way to finish roasted root vegetables or a hearty stew or chili. 
  • Angel Food— our little bloomy, crottin-style cheese; this batch is young, and firm, but very flavorful.
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style-this latest batch is also young
  • Black Goat: our ash-ripened bloomy rind is back—also young
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish.
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors.
  • Yogurt: We will only have yogurt for another couple of weeks, so come early if you want some.

We still have our house-made artisan crackers featuring local grains (milled) from Severson Farm (aka Quality Organics:  herbed flatbread, whole wheat-sesame, blue corn-chevre and oat-chevre. Try a bag with a couple of our cheeses.

Gelato: I love to eat gelato when the weather gets crisp and cool. Check out the flavors:

Urbana’s Market at the Square

  • Grape two ways or Grape Cava Sorbetto
  • Peach-Bourbon Sorbetto
  • Pumpkin
  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Hazelnut
  • Espresso
  • Gingersnap
  • Masala chai
  • Toasted coconut
  • Salted caramel swirl
  • Spiced butter pecan
  • Lemon Verbena
  • Honey peanut brittle – limited

Green city market

  • Pumpkin
  • Grape two ways Sorbetto—this is made with delicious seedless grapes from Klug Farm and Sauvignon Blanc wine
  • Spiced butter pecan
  • Salted caramel swirl
  • Honey Peanut Brittle 

 


Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 10/13/2016 10:54pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

Appropriate fall is upon the farm. The sun’s warmth is limited and now welcome; it comes late in the morning and diminishes in the short afternoon. We haven’t had a frost yet, but our tomatoes look sad clinging to their withering vines.  The remaining okra stand tall, giant pods still cling to the stems, as we’ve become too lazy to pick anymore.  The winter squash are finally starting to ripen and the last of our dry beans are ready to shell.  Our fall greens have sprouted and seem to relish the dry cool nights. The smell of goat breeding wafts through the air around the barns and makes its way toward the house when the wind blows out of the north. Green is still the predominant color as I pan the landscape around us, but the tips of leaves are turning red, orange, yellow and brown. 

Farm Happenings

The Farm Store at Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery “The Real Stand”: We are open Friday-Sunday, 1-4 pm this weekend, October 15th-16th (even though we will be getting ready for our 100 Yard dinner and brunch).  The store will NOT be open Saturday October 22nd because we are hosting The Land Connection’s Farm Beginnings Class all day that day. We still have lots of great things for you to buy—cheese, gelato, meats, sausages, eggs, cider, goat milk soapComing in November: we’ll be sprucing up the shop for holiday sales in November-December. Stay tuned for details.  

Farm Dinners:  We have a few seats left for the 100 Yard Brunch on Sunday, October 16th.  We also have several seats open for the grand finale dinner of the season, “Fall Feast” on October 29th with Chef Ed Sura (formerly with Perennial Virant, now with NoMi Restaurant-Park-Hyatt, Chicago). The menu is now posted, so go to our website, check it out and book your reservations NOW.

Fall Classes and Workshops: Now that the weather has cooled off and we’re not quite so busy, we are offering a couple of all-day cheese making classes and a couple of Wednesday evening workshops on understanding cheese and cheese pairings.  Check out the details and book your spots NOW. The cheese making classes are limited to 7 participants only, and the other classes will involve eating lots of cheese and drinking some really great wines and/or beers too. 

Market News

We will be attending two markets this Saturday: Urbana’s Market at the Square, and Chicago’s Green City Market.  For those of you in Bloomington-Normal, we won’t be returning to the outdoor market, but we plan to be there for the “Pre-Thanksgiving” indoor market on November 19th.   Please support your local farmers by shopping at the farmers’ markets in the fall.  We know a lot of folks are busy, but it’s really the best time of year to find the greatest diversity of farm-fresh products.  Here’s the selection of cheeses this weekend:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine
  • Angel Food— our little bloomy, crottin-style cheese; this batch is young, and firm, but very flavorful.
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style-this latest batch is also young
  • Mocha: this little gooey wonder is a geo-rinded cheese like black goat, but it was rubbed with a little coffee before the white mold covered the rind. It is a special cheese we made just for our CSA members, but we have a few extras that we’re bringing to the markets-first come first served.
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish. (Urbana market goers-if you get to the market early, you’ll get to try the special batch that we made with pickled red peppers)
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors and stands up to any bold companion you throw its way.
  • Yogurt: Very limited quantities this week, so better come early if you want some.

We still have our house-made artisan crackers featuring local grains (milled) from Severson Farm (aka Quality Organics:  herbed flatbread, whole wheat-sesame, blue corn-chevre and oat-chevre. Try a bag with a couple of our cheeses.

Gelato: I love to eat gelato when the weather gets crisp and cool. Check out the flavors:

Urbana’s Market at the Square

  • Grape two ways or Grape Cava Sorbetto
  • Pumpkin-Limited
  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate
  • Gingersnap
  • Masala chai
  • Toasted coconut
  • Biscotti crumble – Limited
  • Fresh mint
  • Salted caramel swirl
  • Spiced butter pecan
  • Honey peanut brittle – limited
  • Honey chevre – limited

Green city market

  • Pumpkin
  • Grape two ways
  • Spiced butter pecan
  • Salted caramel

 


Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 10/6/2016 10:47pm by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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 Farm News

The pairings have been finalized and the doe barn cleaned and organized for four breeding pairs.  Even though we had several days of fall-like weather to get the ladies “in the mood,” the balmy temperatures today had me worried that their hormones would be muted.  My fears were allayed when the bucks were finally brought into the doe barn just before the evening milking.  Within minutes, Harry, Nate and our new Nubian buck “Rick” had mounted at least two does in their respective harems.  Our little La Mancha guy was a bit intimidated by his towering maidens, but soon enough, the does’ desire to dominate will be overcome by their desire to procreate.

As the level of lily-white goat milk drops on the dipstick of our bulk tank, we’ve been looking ahead to making fall-winter milk cheeses with jersey cow milk from our friends at Kilgus Farmstead.  This week, we launched a couple of experimental batches of our “chaorce” style cow milk bloomy (snow fog) and a wash rind cheese.  It’s fun to peer into the cheese vat and see a veneer of golden butterfat covering the surface of the milk.  Even though our goats forage on pasture, their milk fat doesn’t retain the beta-carotene that gives pasture-raised cow milk that lovely “egg-yolk” yellow hue.  The smell of the milk and the feel of the curd are so different between the two milks too.  We should have some of these little cheeses for you to try at the markets in a few weeks.

cow milk cheese

The early stages of our little "washed" rind cow-milk cheese

Farm Happenings

The Farm Store at Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery “The Real Stand”: We continue fall hours over the next couple of weekends: Friday-Sunday, 1-4 pm only.  Pear Cider pressed right here at the farm is still available as frozen half gallons. In addition, we have the last of our home-grown tomatoes, cheese, gelato, Bane Family Meats and Piemonte Sausages, including goat merguezCome check out our very own pasture-raised “cabrito. We have a variety of cuts for sale, including ground meat, stew meat, shoulder and leg roasts. We also have a fresh supply of our goat milk soaps made by Red Barn Farm. 

Farm Dinners:  Our 2016 Season is drawing to an end. The 100 Yard Dinner in October is now sold out, but we still have plenty of seats for the Brunch on Sunday, October 16th.  We also have several seats open for the Fall Feast with Chef Ed Sura (formerly with Perennial Virant, now with NoMi Restaurant-Park-Hyatt, Chicago) Go to our website, book your reservations NOW.

Stay tuned for upcoming fall classes and workshops at the farm including cheese making, small dairy intensive (with The Land Connection), cheese pairings and more. Also, stay tuned as we "gussy up" our farm store for the holiday season.  

Market News

We will be attending two markets this Saturday: Urbana’s Market at the Square, and Chicago’s Green City Market.  Although it’s warm now, the weather should be down-right cool on Saturday, perfect for loading up on fresh produce, cheese, gelato, and all the other marvels to be found at the markets this time of year.  Please support your local farmers by shopping at the farmers’ markets.  We know a lot of folks get busy in the fall, but it’s really the best time of year to find the greatest diversity of farm-fresh products.  Here’s the selection of cheeses this weekend:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper, dried Juliet tomato (this is probably the last week for dried tomato chevre, so first come, first served)
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine—the perfect crumbly texture with a tangy creamy finish-always great for a salad or atop a stew or roasted root vegetables.
  • Angel Food— our little bloomy, crottin-style cheese; this batch is young, and firm, but very flavorful.
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style-this latest batch is also young
  • Black Goat: ash-ripened with a delicate yeasty rind, also young this week
  • Young Caprino Romano-this “experimental” hard, raw-milk cheese is quite mild but has a lovely, slightly-sharp milky flavor. It’s dry enough to shave or grate too. This is the last week of availability for this cheese, so give it a try.
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish.
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors and stands up to any bold companion you throw its way.
  • Yogurt: both pints and quarts available this week.

We still have our house-made artisan crackers featuring local grains (milled) from Severson Farm (aka Quality Organics:  herb flatbread, whole wheat-sesame, blue corn-chevre and oat-chevre. Try a bag with a couple of our cheeses.

Gelato is still very much “in season.” We have a great line up of flavors this week, including pumpkin. You shouldn’t have to worry about it melting too fast before you get home, so try some at the market and take home a pint:

Urbana’s Market at the Square

  • Spiced butter pecan
  • Fresh mint
  • Vanilla
  • Salted caramel
  • Toasted coconut
  • Masala chai
  • Pumpkin
  • Grape two ways Sorbetto
  • Gingersnap
  • Honey Peanut brittle

Green City Market

  • Honey chèvre
  • Grape two ways
  • Salted caramel
  • Caramel apple
  • Fresh Mint

Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.

Posted 9/30/2016 8:53am by Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell.

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Farm News

While we harvested our very modest “Warthog” wheat crop in July, it’s been sitting in our kid barn waiting to be threshed. Threshing separates the grain from the straw. Over the millenia, there have been many ways to do this, most of them, until our recent machine era, involving manual labor. Gradually, as we realized no one around us would bother harvesting and processing our paltry 1/8th of an acre wheat plot, we became resigned to threshing using stone-age technology, cognizant of the disproportionate labor to product ratio. Dragging our feet (obviously, since the crop was harvested two months ago), we were trying to generate enthusiasm, the deadline of our 100 Yard Dinner needs fast approaching. Then, last week, during an off-hand conversation with our friends from Spence Farm in Fairbury (they grow lots of acres of heirloom grains, including the Warthog variety of wheat we had grown), they offered to help with their grain thresher, the “All Crop.”  This 1940’s era machine was designed to separate grains from many different crop species, from large corn kernels to tiny amaranth seeds.  We set a date, and yesterday, we loaded up our sheaths of wheat and headed north to Fairbury.

threshing wheat

Their 1961 Allis Chalmers tractor (painted a vibrant orange) coupled to the 1940’s All Crop via PTO drive are a testament to the durability and “can-do” attitude of old farm equipment. With a little TLC, these metal work horses complain little and get the job done.  As we gently loaded armfuls of wheat onto the conveyor belt, I marveled at the speed and efficiency with which the All Crop sucked up the sheaths, stripped off the grain and spit out the straw.  Within 30 minutes, our tiny mountain of wheat was converted into a scant bucket-full of wheat berries. 

the harvest

milling

Looking into the bucket, the sad realities of letting the crop sit in our kid barn for way too long began to sink in.  The opportunists had taken advantage of our procrastination: English sparrows, mice, even little pill bugs had gorged themselves on our precious (indeed) grain.  There was even evidence of a goat break out or two. Thankfully, we were able to get enough to mill into flour for our first-ever 100 Yard Dinner bread.  Our ambitions to be grain farmers have been humbling.  We will stick to dairy farming for the time being. 

american gothic

"American Gothic?" I think not!!

Farm Happenings

The Farm Store at Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery “The Real Stand”: We are open Friday-Sunday, 1-4 pm only.  NEW THIS WEEK IN THE STORE:  Pear Cider pressed right here at the farm. We are selling it fresh-frozen, so you can thaw it and enjoy it at your leisure. In addition, we have the last of our home-grown tomatoes,, cheese, gelato, Bane Family Meats and Piemonte Sausages, including goat merguezCome check out our very own pasture-raised “cabrito. We have a variety of cuts for sale, including ground meat, stew meat, shoulder and leg roasts. We also have a fresh supply of our goat milk soaps made by Red Barn Farm. 

Farm Dinners: The 100 Yard Dinner in October is now sold out, but we still have plenty of seats for the Brunch on Sunday, October 16th.  We also have several seats open for the Fall Feast with Chef Ed Sura (formerly with Perennial Virant, now with NoMi Restaurant-Park-Hyatt, Chicago) Go to our website, book your reservations NOW.

CUFarmers: This is the last week of ordering from our multi-farmer, hyper-local buying club, so if you’ve been curious about how this works, this is your last chance for the season.  Order online (opens Friday at 8AM and closes the following Monday at 10 pm) and then pick up your order at the University of IL Research Park on Wednesday afternoon (4-6 pm).  It’s an easy, convenient way to get the best local food around.  Customers love the ease of ordering and the convenient pick up location. We will be evaluating CU Farmers over the winter, and we hope to make it more attractive to potential customers.

Market News

We will be attending three markets this Saturday: Urbana’s Market at the Square, Bloomington’s Farmers’ Market and Chicago’s Green City MarketFor our Bloomington Market goers, we will be attending the market every other Saturday in October. This means we will be there on October 1st and return on October 15th.  The weather should be fall-like, perfect for loading up on fresh produce, cheese, gelato, and all the other marvels to be found at the markets this time of year.  Please support your local farmers by shopping at the farmers’ markets.  We know a lot of folks get busy in the fall, but it’s really the best time of year to find the greatest diversity of farm-fresh products.  Here’s the selection of cheeses this weekend:

  • Fresh chevre: plain, herb de Provence, cracked pepper, dried Juliet tomato (this flavor will be leaving the repertoire very soon, so stock up now)
  • Raw-milk feta aged in whey brine—the perfect crumbly texture with a tangy creamy finish-always great for a salad or atop a stew as the weather beckons warming comfort foods
  • Angel Food— our little bloomy, crottin-style cheese; This batch is young, and firm, but very flavorful
  • Little Bloom on the Prairie:  Camembert style-this latest batch is also young
  • Black Goat: ash-ripened with a delicate yeasty rind, also young this week (although we do have a few of the really gooey ones for our special customers who love the goo-just ask us)
  • Young Caprino Romano-this “experimental” hard, raw-milk cheese is quite mild but has a lovely, slightly-sharp milky flavor. It’s dry enough to shave or grate too. This is the last week of availability for this cheese, so give it a try.
  • Moonglo: our version of a raw milk tomme, this cheese is firm, sharp and has a lovely fruity finish
  • Magia Negra: made in a style similar to Manchego, this raw milk cheese is loaded with complex nutty flavors and stands up to any bold companion you throw its way.
  • Yogurt: Very limited this week at Urbana and Green City Markets only

We have our house-made artisan crackers featuring local grains (milled) from Severson Farm (aka Quality Organics) at all three markets:  herbed flatbread, whole wheat-sesame, blue corn-chevre and oat-chevre. Try a bag with a couple of our cheeses.

Gelato is still very much “in season.” We have started to make some fall flavors as well as the standards. You shouldn’t have to worry about it melting too fast before you get home, so try some at the market and take home a pint:

  • Biscotti Crumble
  • Fresh Mint
  • Gingersnap
  • Masala Chai
  • Vanilla
  • Salted Caramel Swirl
  • Grape 2 Ways Sorbetto
  • Pumpkin
  • Honey Peanut Brittle Crunch
  • Chocolate

Limited Flavors

  • Espresso
  • Honey Chevre
  • Spiced Butter Pecan
  • Peach Cardamom (Green City Market only)
  • Lemon Verbena (Green City Market only)
  • Caramel Apple (Green City Market only)

Copyright 2016. Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC. 2016. All rights reserved. 4410 N. Lincoln Ave., Champaign, Illinois 61822 Prairie Fruits Farm & Creamery, LLC is responsible for the content of this email. Please contact Leslie Cooperband or Wes Jarrell with any inquiries.